Einstein's Bridge

John G. Cramer


Einstein's Bridge

Einstein's Bridge

  • Title: Einstein's Bridge
  • Author: John G. Cramer
  • ISBN: 9780380788316
  • Page: 374
  • Format: Paperback



In a newborn twenty first century, tunnels through space time have connected our planet with hitherto unimagined alternate universes The genius minds working at the Superconducting Super Collider SSC project a fifty three mile long underground particle accelerator George Griffin and Roger Coulton have realized their greatest dream, and novelist Alice Lancaster is thIn a newborn twenty first century, tunnels through space time have connected our planet with hitherto unimagined alternate universes The genius minds working at the Superconducting Super Collider SSC project a fifty three mile long underground particle accelerator George Griffin and Roger Coulton have realized their greatest dream, and novelist Alice Lancaster is there to witness their triumph Reaching out into the vast cosmos, Griffin and Coulton have finally made contact But with whom Or ratherwith what For their message has been received by an ancient, hostile entity that combs the many universes searching for knowledge and life to absorb and annihilate And now the entity has locked onto a faint, persisting signal emanating from a distant, uncommonly fertile feeding groundlled Earth.


Recent Comments "Einstein's Bridge"

(Warning: this review contains mild spoilers!)Einstein's Bridge is a novel about ideas, and on the basis of its ideas it works pretty well. I don't think it's giving anything away to mention that the story deals with contact with an alien species, and in some ways the aliens do what one would expect them to do in such a story; but I thought that the plot twist concerning that species' relationship to Earth was interesting. Similarly, the story introduces us to a world in which the Superconductin [...]

This is a book of hard science fiction written by a physicist who really should have hired a ghost writer. It's an interesting concept but too frequently reads like a textbook on theoretical physics. The characters are two dimensional and thoroughly unbelievable and the pacing is terrible. In this 300 page book, the characters are all unaware of the conflict until about 100 pages in and the climax happens roughly 100 pages from the end. In the hands of a more skilled writer the 100 page epilogue [...]

Fun stuff! Lots of detailed physics. Better biology this time around, too. Time travel is, of course, hugely overdone in sci-fi--it's way too handy as part of a plot. But here it's just one aspect of the story, as well as very nicely done.I love Cramer's voice! He's a sensible scientist who doesn't take himself too seriously, and his characters are people I would have lots in common with. Things get a little over the top at the end. The power that the characters wield--my goodness, I kept thinki [...]

Here's a fun little excerpt from Einstein's Gate"That's the argument we're using to persuade the Food and Drug administration, so they'll approve our application for preliminary human trials to try small doses on certain retarded children, alzheimer's patients, and other that show evidence of synaptine deficiency."'Morons and the hopelessly senile, he thought. What a waste.'Wow I have never wanted book characters to all die more. May there be a horrible accident at the Superconducting Supercolli [...]

The author sets his book in and around the Superconducting Supercollider in Waxahachie but admits in a prologue he had to rewrite it after Congress cancelled the project in a fit of pique. It shows. The book reads like parts of three books cut up and randomly jammed together. The entire first half is taken up with introducing the three main characters and endless, mind-numbing, exposition on subatomic physics, most of which has absolutely nothing to do with the plot and is offered almost exclusi [...]

Cool idea, and the author has the background to place the story in the proper setting and political atmosphere. However, the merits of the book stop there. The characters are unbelievable, nauseating at times, and vacillate between ineffectual and superhuman. At least it's a fairly quick read.

“Einstein’s Bridge, a novel of hard science fiction,” by John Cramer (Avon, 1997). Cramer is a professor of physics at the University of Washington, and often works at the CERN accelerator. The idea is clever and engrossing: There are many, many universes, in individual Bubbles, with intelligent life in them. In one universe, the Hive Mind has evolved. It is insectile, with Queens, Workers, Soldiers, Fliers, Drones. It has learned to cross to other universes, where it destroys all other in [...]

Physicists to the rescue! A wonderful gem of a book! Hard Science fiction to the core, which becomes very clear in multiple ways. The author himself is a theoretical physicist and the one who coined the transactional interpretation of quantum mechanics in 1986, and, luckily for the reader, he explains the physics perfectly, but not in a lecturing kind of way that would have a negative impact on the reading experience. The story stands and if the reader does not understand some of the physics (or [...]

Readability 6. Rating 7. Written by a practicing physicist, this book is noted as a “novel of hard science fiction”. Very interesting genre. Cramer sets his tale in a world in which the superconducting supercollider is built, and the energies released by it attract the attention of hostile and friendly aliens from other bubble universes. As a result, this world is destroyed, and then erased, and the new world is prevented from developing the SSC by two of the protagonists, with the aid of th [...]

This is a book that snaps in half partway through. You can almost see the point where the writer gets so frustrated with politicians screwing up the scientific process that he abandons his half-written hard science fiction novel and leaps with both feet into sheer wish-fulfillment venting where the author avatar can manipulate people at will, get the girl, and tell the politicians exactly how shitty and stupid they're being. Which is a good personal exercise, I'll tell you that, but doesn't make [...]

This book is very fast paced hard science fiction. High energy physics and technological understanding meet doom invasion scenarios, (very well done though instead of campy) multiple main characters, time travel, and even some thoughtful social criticism toward real life politicians which gives the book a political thriller twist for the second half. Once I got going I couldn't put it down.I'll certainly check out Twistor (also by Cramer) in the future.

So about 3/4 of the way through this book, the reader's asked to make a huge leap of faith in terms of what is possible in this sort of universe. The rest of the novel was pretty well grounded in that hard science fiction, we can at very least handwave explain this science way. I couldn't make the leap and as a consequence the few chapters were just a spectacular failure for me. Kind of soured the rest of the read.

My first hard science fiction novel was a delight. Spellbinding drama in the world of scientific research combined the best of quantum physics, wormholes, aliens, and time travel. I saw elements of my college quantum physics, relativistic physics, and astrophysics; then similarities to sci-fi books I have loved: Ender’s Game – the hive, Outer Limits – aliens and parallel universes, Star Trek – wormholes, and dealing with the paradox of time travel and changing the future.

I have to say that this is one of my favorite hard Science fiction books. If you haven't read it you should. A note To become a favorite a book has to have that something special to it that makes you want to read it more then once. I have read this 3-4 times and honestly i will probably read it again 2-3 more times before i take a dirt nap.

A solid and entertaining hard science fiction novel by a well-known professional physicist: alternate histories, good aliens, bad aliens, super technologies, magic genetics and quantum communications, and the destruction of humanity by monster bugs, undone by intrepid inter-universal travelersefia/2013/10/07/einstein

This story was HARD, HARD sci-fi. I very much enjoyed it, but my degree is in Math and so I was not lost in the physics and pseudo-physics discussed in the book. There were some ideas that i have never seen or heard of before used in the book. It is fun to read something that is not a rewrite of someone else's work.

This is a great book, interesting ideas, fascinating characters, etc. right up to the point where they hit the 'time vortex', and get a re-do. After that, it's crap. You get the feeling some dumb-ass editor decided to convince the author to write a more "movie-friendly" ending about half-way through and just killed a pretty good book.

Somewhat oddly paced (many pages spent on minutiae, with world shattering developments just glossed over), but I've got to give it credit for the best time travel ret-con fix up ever (written after real-world political developments destroyed the premise of the book.)

Interesting combination of dated and still relevant ideas. great science with decent writing and simplistic plotting. It needed an updated postscript to go over the discovery of the Higgs boson this year and since politics plays such a major role, an update to the political landscape.

Read this book when I first moved to Texas and was fascinated to learn that a supercollider was supposed to be built nearby but construction was halted. This is the [fictional] story of why it didn't get built, and it is a fun read.

The hardcover version included an afterword and glossary. These may be found online: faculty.washington/jcramerThe author's site: faculty.washington/jcramer/

I wasn't able to finish this book. When the writer thinks that Alabama and Louisiana share a border (and they don't) it's not a good sign of things to come. The skill of the writer is more to blame than the notion in this case.

way to technicalybe later?

Maybe proof that being a scientist is not good enough alone to weaving an interesting tale

Tried too hard to sound smart. Good science fiction incorporates the science with the story effectively. I don't think this book did that too well.

Science Fiction

super fun, super deep science, pretty compelling story

An interesting story using Einstein-Rosen bridges to connect multiple universes and alien races together, some benevolent and some malevolent.

A real hard-scifi novel, gritty atmosphere, real characters a must read for hard-scifi fans of course!

I read this book every year. It's my favorite book. I own a first edition hardcover signed copy (signed twice - once generically, and a second time personalized to me).


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    Published :2018-08-21T15:46:45+00:00