'Til Faith Do Us Part: The Rise of Interfaith Marriage and the Future of American Religion, Family, and Society

Interfaith marriage is on the rise in America, from 15% of all marriages in 1988 to 36% in 2010 This is true in every region of the country, for people at every income and educational level, and across religious traditions evangelicals, Jews, Muslims, Mormons, Catholics, and others are increasingly marrying outside the faith On the surface, this looks like another triumInterfaith marriage is on the rise in America, from 15% of all marriages in 1988 to 36% in 2010 This is true in every region of the country, for people at every income and educational level, and across religious traditions evangelicals, Jews, Muslims, Mormons, Catholics, and others are increasingly marrying outside the faith On the surface, this looks like another triumph of the American melting pot But that is only part of the story As Wall Street Journal veteran Naomi Schaefer Riley shows in this provocative book, interfaith marriages are often fraught with peril People often marry at a time when they have drifted away from their religious roots, and it may seem as if the only relevant question is who will officiate at the wedding But once couples are married, and especially after they have kids, religious questions reassert themselves Should we donate to the church How do we handle holidays How will we raise the kids Do we take them to services Send them to religious schools These questions, and many others, increase marital tension Indeed, as Riley shows, interfaith couples report lower levels of marital satisfaction than same faith couples Yet, while an overwhelming majority of Americans claims that religion is important to them, interfaith couples rarely discuss these issues before the wedding Indeed, many equate religion, the source of their most deeply held values, with the skin deep matter of race, believing it bigoted to emphasize shared religious values As a result, they are often woefully unprepared for the challenges of interfaith marriage Drawing on a groundbreaking new national survey of 2,500 Americans and extensive interviews with couples, religious leaders, and marriage counselors, Riley offers readers an intimate look at this sensitive topic that will shape faith and marriage in America for generations to come.
Til Faith Do Us Part The Rise of Interfaith Marriage and the Future of American Religion Family and Society Interfaith marriage is on the rise in America from % of all marriages in to % in This is true in every region of the country for people at every income and educational level and acros

  • Title: 'Til Faith Do Us Part: The Rise of Interfaith Marriage and the Future of American Religion, Family, and Society
  • Author: Naomi Schaefer Riley
  • ISBN: 9780199873746
  • Page: 129
  • Format: Hardcover
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      Posted by:Naomi Schaefer Riley
      Published :2018-04-12T04:02:08+00:00

    About the Author

    Naomi Schaefer Riley

    NAOMI SCHAEFER RILEY is a weekly columnist for the New York Post and a former Wall Street Journal editor and writer whose work focuses on higher education, religion, philanthropy and culture She is the author of six books, her most recent titled, The New Trail of Tears How Washington Is Destroying American Indians, Encounter, 2016 Her book, Til Faith Do Us Part How Interfaith Marriage is Transforming America Oxford, 2013 , was named an editor s pick by the New York Times Book Review.

    660 Comment

    • sharon said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      A thoughtful, fair-minded, and well-researched overview of interfaith marriage in contemporary America. Given how often author bias or a clear agenda shows up in books like these, I was really pleased by how evenhanded Naomi Schaefer Riley's approach was. Her introduction lays out her own investment in her subject -- being one half of an interfaith marriage -- and I wondered if there would be some massaging of the data or an otherwise overly positive view of the topic for this reason. But throug [...]

    • J. said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      Very good informational book about interfaith marriage. The point of the book is that there is a stistically significant (albeight slight) difference between married couples who share a religion and those who do not share a religion---this in every facet of married life.Thus, same-faith couples are slightly happier with their lives than interfaith couples. Same-Faith couples are slightly less likely to divorce than interfaith couples. The children of same-faith couples are slightly more likely t [...]

    • B said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      This was an intriguing and troubling read. The material seemed well researched and was presented clearly and thoughtfully. While there seemed to be less statistical data for Jews and Mormons, the three religious groups most represented throughout the book were Jews, Catholics and Mormons - I found it perhaps less than thorough in that respect. Most of the rest of this review is my reaction to what the results presented show, less to the book itself. It was unfortunate to read about how little re [...]

    • Amy Qualls said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      tl;dr: it's hard.Would've liked a larger sample size, but I'm unaware of anyone who has managed a larger one.

    • Judie said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      Interfaith marriage is a part of life in America. It has affected the way various religions treat people who want to marry someone of a different faith, (e.g Greek Orthodox and Roman Catholics have fewer obstacles in marrying each other, Catholics can marry non-Catholics in a church, the non-Catholic spouse doesn’t have to convert or promise to raise their children as Catholic.) Naomi Schaefer Riley, who did marry someone of another faith, interviewed 200 members of the clergy, marriage coun [...]

    • Adrienna said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      Naomi Riley wrote a book to cover real life examples of integrating other religious ideas in marriages today--to be diversified and even having two wedding ceremonies to satisfy the two faiths. She cites from Torah on interfaith marriages which has already happened in biblical times: Moses with Zipporah; Esther and king of Persia; and well-known and told story of Ruth.However, according to Deut. 7:3, it is believed that the "chosen" faith and people: Jews are not to intermingle or intermarry wit [...]

    • Danni said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      This book takes the work of the author in studying the many varied relationships of interfaith couples and presents it to the general public. She gives readers a very comprehensive look at many different aspects of the relationships: getting to know each other, wedding ceremonies, kids, ect. Personal stories and interviews are scattered throughout the book to mix up the extreme amount of data that is thrown at readers. All in all, the content is fairly solid. I was surprised by the material and [...]

    • Meepspeeps said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      The author uses research and interview quotes to tell a sobering tale of how interfaith marriage affects the couples and the USA in general. I highly recommend it because she explains some of the assumptions couples make based on (1) their level of commitment to their beliefs, (2) what information children (or future children) will accept, and (3) the USA "insistence" on embracing diversity. She helps guide the reader through the differences between religious beliefs (and the accompanying ritual [...]

    • Alanna said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      I picked this book up for two reasons. The first was pure curiosity, as I've been on a pretty strong non-fiction kick lately. The second was personal interest in a topic that may or may not affect my own life in the future.The subject matter in the book is well-covered. Riley addresses just about every aspect of inter-faith marriage that you could think of. On the other hand, the writing style is very repetitive and, in places, downright boring. I skipped parts of the book near the end because o [...]

    • Becky said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      Well done. Seems to be novel material. Skewed a bit toward covering Judaism because the author is Jewish, but on the whole, a very insightful, data-driven, interesting look at interfaith marriage and what it means in families and society. Also, the book opens with a narrative from Judy O'Connor, wife of late Pittsburgh Mayor Bob O'Connor… just a random tidbit for my fellow Pittsburghers.Maybe I should just add the caveat that I could not possibly ever see myself in an interfaith marriage; I do [...]

    • Hannah Emery said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      I read this book to evaluate its utility for undergrads in my Sociology of Families course, and will definitely be using some excerpts from it. Riley interviews both religious leaders and lay people from a range of different American religions; the book gives significant emphasis to Christianity and Judaism, but this isn't surprising given that these are the two religions most common in the United States and the most common source of inter-faith marriages. I found the book both accessible for un [...]

    • Mimi Bear said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      I found this book very fascinating and timely. In a global world, with fewer and fewer faith communities, we are all surrounded by people of different faiths raising families. I saw a glimpse into the struggles and paths that couples take to keep their marriages together, and raise kids in an increasingly difficult world. I wish such insights would make the world more tolerant, but I am certain only the tolerant will read such topics. Good, practical insights and details into all faiths. Enjoyed [...]

    • Chad said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      Overly focused on Christian-Jewish relationships, this is pretty dismal in light of marriage hopefuls who have differing religious backgrounds. I feel like she wrote this to prove her own point that interfaith marriages are challenging and more possibly doomed than interfaith ones. I, on the other hand, am it of this mind but understand that it can be challenging but I feel more hopeful for coupled going into this having strong backgrounds in their faith and in finding s "middle way" together.

    • Alyssa said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      Well-researched and analyzed, 'Til Faith Do Us Part's author Naomi Schaefer Riley discusses the challenges, tensions, successes, and the taboo of interfaith marriage, including the wedding ceremony and raising children. This book has definitely given me a lot to think about and I recommend this to interfaith couples discussing marriage.

    • Liz De Coster said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      An interesting book, though I don't find Riley's arguments overall compelling. I think she undermined herself a bit by sounding fairly close-minded as to what constituted a 'successful' interfaith marriage and extensive discussion of post-marital conversions (due to personal crises or other life changes).

    • Jonathan said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      Ugh. Interesting and useful conclusion but oh the flaws that precede it!

    • Whitney said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      A good look at interfaith marriage. Not all of the studies were as robust as I would have liked, but I admire the author's initiative and overall treatment of the subject

    • Steve Gross said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      The usually reliable Naomi Shaefer Riley presents a farrago of anecdotes, statistics and personal history to reveal pretty much nothing new about intermarriage in America.

    • Mindy said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      I just skipped around and read the parts of this book that interested me. What I read was fascinating!

    • A. P. D. G. said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      I enjoyed it immensely, and reminded me of a lesson I'd been taught of a child, don't marry outside your own faith.

    • Jon Webber said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 04:02 AM

      interesting combination of statistical textbook and scores of personal stories. Very positive of LDS marriage. (same faith & young) suggests Jews take note.

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