Whiskey Women: The Untold Story of How Women Saved Bourbon, Scotch, and Irish Whiskey

Shortly after graduating from University of Glasgow in 1934, Elizabeth Bessie Williamson began working as a temporary secretary at the Laphroaig Distillery on the Scottish island Islay Williamson quickly found herself joining the boys in the tasting room, studying the distillation process, and winning them over with her knowledge of Scottish whisky After the owner of LapShortly after graduating from University of Glasgow in 1934, Elizabeth Bessie Williamson began working as a temporary secretary at the Laphroaig Distillery on the Scottish island Islay Williamson quickly found herself joining the boys in the tasting room, studying the distillation process, and winning them over with her knowledge of Scottish whisky After the owner of Laphroaig passed away, Williamson took over the prestigious company and became the American spokesperson for the entire Scotch whisky industry Impressing clients and showing her passion as the Scotch Whisky Association s trade ambassador, she soon gained fame within the industry, becoming known as the greatest female distiller Whiskey Women tells the tales of women who have created this industry, from Mesopotamia s first beer brewers and distillers to America s rough and tough bootleggers during Prohibition Women have long distilled, marketed, and owned significant shares in spirits companies Williamson s story is one of many among the influential women who changed the Scotch whisky industry as well as influenced the American bourbon whiskey and Irish whiskey markets Until now their stories have remained untold.
Whiskey Women The Untold Story of How Women Saved Bourbon Scotch and Irish Whiskey Shortly after graduating from University of Glasgow in Elizabeth Bessie Williamson began working as a temporary secretary at the Laphroaig Distillery on the Scottish island Islay Williamson quic

  • Title: Whiskey Women: The Untold Story of How Women Saved Bourbon, Scotch, and Irish Whiskey
  • Author: Fred Minnick
  • ISBN: 9781612345642
  • Page: 478
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Whiskey Women The Untold Story of How Women Saved The necessary new book Whiskey Women The Untold Story of How Women Saved Bourbon, Scotch Irish Whiskey tells us exactly why the pinky in the air, fruity drink clich has never, ever been true.Forget umbrellas in cocktails Kentucky journalist Fred Minnick shows us how the fairer sex established liquor techniques, culture, and tastes as we know it today. Women Who Whiskey Women Who Whiskey is an experimental whiskey club for women Whisky tasting events and whiskey cocktails. Jim Croce Cigarettes, Whiskey Wild, Wild Women Lyrics Lyrics to Cigarettes, Whiskey Wild, Wild Women by Jim Croce Cigarettes, whiskey and wild, wild women They ll drive you crazy, they ll drive you The Glenlivet BrandVoice Whiskey Club For Women Shakes Jul , The inspiration behind Women Who Whiskey, an experimental women only club, was mostly a sense of indignation, founder and principal Julia Ritz Whiskey And Women Explicit by Moonshine Bandits on Check out Whiskey And Women Explicit by Moonshine Bandits on Music Stream ad free or purchase CD s and MPs now on . Chamberlain Eyeglasses in Whiskey Tortoise for Women Chamberlain Eyeglasses in Crystal for Women Get the job done in assertive, bold frames with a square shape and a strong bridge. Whiskey Rebellion The Whiskey Rebellion also known as the Whiskey Insurrection was a tax protest in the United States beginning in and ending in during the presidency of George Washington, ultimately under the command of Revolutionary war veteran Major James McFarlane The so called whiskey tax was the first tax imposed on a domestic product by the newly formed federal government. Durand Eyeglasses in Whiskey Tortoise for Women Warby Parker At checkout, you can use the card associated with your flexible spending or health spending account to pay for prescription eyeglasses and sunglasses If your vision insurance plan includes an out of network benefit most do , it s easy to apply for reimbursement after purchasing A Cult Show s Recipe for Success Whiskey, Twitter and Jul , Wynonna Earp, a horror western on Syfy, demonstrates how a passionate fan base and a creative team that nurtures that enthusiasm can help an under the radar series flourish. Western Whiskey Gazette WWG South C St was a mixed bag of occupancies in The Bonner Shaft of the Gould Currey Mining Company was just a couple of blocks downhill, as were the VT Railroad tracks.

    • Unlimited [Children's Book] ☆ Whiskey Women: The Untold Story of How Women Saved Bourbon, Scotch, and Irish Whiskey - by Fred Minnick Ø
      478 Fred Minnick
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Children's Book] ☆ Whiskey Women: The Untold Story of How Women Saved Bourbon, Scotch, and Irish Whiskey - by Fred Minnick Ø
      Posted by:Fred Minnick
      Published :2018-07-24T07:35:20+00:00

    About the Author

    Fred Minnick

    Fred Minnick Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Whiskey Women: The Untold Story of How Women Saved Bourbon, Scotch, and Irish Whiskey book, this is one of the most wanted Fred Minnick author readers around the world.

    386 Comment

    • McLean said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      It is perhaps telling that all of the blurbs on the back of this book are just descriptions of the contents, without any actual praise for the writing. The writing is horrible. Dull, meandering, and full of what I will generously assume are typos.This book contains a lot of useful information that would be hard to find elsewhere. As a reference, it does fill a useful niche. But this is content deserving of a much better writer than it received.In addition, for a book purporting to tell the story [...]

    • Whisky Lassie said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      I am a whisky enthusiast who has many whisky books in her collection. I was skeptical when I heard about this book but then received it as a gift from a friend. I read it cover to cover and truly enjoyed the history, the ease at which it can be read as well as the content. Fred wrote this book so that anyone, no matter where they are on their own personal whisky journey can understand and appreciate this story. The fact that he has researched and well documented is proof at how dedicated he was [...]

    • Emily said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      Though Mr. Minnick tackles a multitude of subjects with a plethora of sources, he seems to lose sight (repeatedly) of what exactly is his chosen subject. He begins giving a brief history of beer in Sumeria/Egypt that is so utterly incomplete (and incorrect, I'm told by a friendly Egyptologist) that I immediately began to have misgivings about reading this book. Based on the description by the publisher, I expected numerous vignettes about women who played important roles in the history of whiske [...]

    • Stephanie said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      Reading this book helped me feel a real connection to the whiskey industry. Women have had such a significant role in the creation and preservation of distilled alcohol. It was impressive to read about the stories of many recognizable brands and to learn about the women behind the bottle. While women are welcome in the alcohol industry in present times, they haven't always been in recognizable positions of power. Kentucky has their very first female master distiller with Marianne Barnes at Woodf [...]

    • D Kremer said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      If I️ needed a whiskey resource book or if I️ was in the industry then maybe I’d like this book. It seemed like a well researched college paper that I️ had little interest in. I got distracted or fell asleep at least ten times per page.

    • Derek Post said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      Great book about some amazing lady leaders taking the reader thru the span of time to today's current distillers

    • Thomas Skrmetti said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      An interesting read on an under discussed side of whiskey history. I just wish there had been more individual detail with some of the stories.

    • Joshua Feldman said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      "Whiskey Women: The Untold Story of How Women Saved Bourbon, Scotch, and Irish Whiskey" is an important work in the field of whiskey history. The particular view that "Whiskey Women" undoes is the notion that whiskey is a man's drink and that, after that fact, it's OK for women to like it too. The "it's OK, honey, I'll scoot over for you and make room for you on this bench on the whiskey express" notion that is embodied in such facts as whiskey marketing people developing extremely light whiskie [...]

    • Ashley said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      I am whiskey drinker. I usually choose Jameson or Bushmills on the rocks, although I’m also a fan of the Four Roses Bourbon out of Lawrenceburg. Until my trip to Edinburgh last year I thought I loathed Scotch whisky; I couldn’t take the peaty, smoky smell. Upon being introduced to the Speyside single malt Scotch whiskies, however, I found another brown liquor to add to the rotation.Given my love of whiskies, and knowing my feminist views, my husband found the perfect book to surprise me with [...]

    • Lissa Notreallywolf said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      In my preview I mentioned that there were some historical factoids in the primitive era I found a little questionable. The whole book has an anecdotal feel about it, sort of like you sat down at a Whiskey event with someone storytelling for another drink. The stories about the women are dry, however without sympathy or anything beyond a news reporters read into their lives. I gather that examining personal papers wasn't a priority. I found the perspective sexist, despite the focus on women, like [...]

    • Molly said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      I was very disappointed in the book. I am a serious Whiskey drinking woman. I love whiskey and I love to study history, so I thought this was the perfect book for me. It was not. For starters, It is poorly written and a complete bore. There is so much great literary non-fiction on the market now, this book is the opposite. I also did not think this book lived up to it's title. It did not go into nearly enough detail about any specific woman in the whiskey world. One of the most interesting chapt [...]

    • Myra Breckinridge said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      This isn't so much a book about the untold story of women in the whiskey business, as it is a summary of women who should be acknowledged in whiskey history. As an outline or entry point into the essential contributions women have made, it is great. Minnick is focused on including as many names as possible, and heralding those who have made substantial strides in the business.However, it lacks the life, flair, and space to be anything more. The writing is impersonal and distant, lacking the thou [...]

    • G-Soxx said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      Good book about how women have been involved in and transformed the whisky industry, from the "Tough Irish Women" to the Scotch and Americans. Some have criticized the author's lack of research, but he has provided copious notes for each chapter and a bibliography. What more do you want? This work was written on a bare bones budget with some travel paid for by one distillery, but for the most part, I see this book as a labor of love. I respect that. The book is more academic in nature and may no [...]

    • Nicole said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      For some reason, Whiskey Women was slow starting, but very fascinating and empowering once I got into the history of women and drink, especially the early North American trade. Author Fred Minnick doesn't seem to miss a single detail, and a reader will surely get an education not only in the important role women have played in the spirits industry, but also in the nature of distillation, aging, and tasting of all types of whiskeys/whiskys. And, as I'm finishing it, I have added at least five oth [...]

    • Stefanie said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      An interesting book about the history of whiskey and the role women played in it. It got a little dry toward the end but I learned a lot. Admittedly, I picked this up on a whim, especially since I live in bourbon country in Kentucky. Like some of the other reviewers, I wish the author had delved deeper in to the lives of the women in the whiskey world and stayed more closely to topic. In the end it felt like he was doing a bit of advertising for some of the biggest whiskey makers.

    • Christen said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      It was brief account. But it felt like listing the brands and the women involved and did that for the top brands. It was an interesting read, but I felt I was just reading bullet points. Granted, it was information I never knew but felt impersonal. Straight and to the point, but that is what whiskey drinkers like, right?

    • Jennifer said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      It took a while to find its footing. The discussion of the 20th century onward flowed much better. My first impression was that it was written like a high schooler's attempt at an essay which made me a bit worried. Switching over to the audiobook was something of an improvement though.

    • Emily Walter said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      I was excited to read this but early on it became a let down. At the outset it offers a history of whiskey in Great Britain with lots of flimsy speculation about individual womens' roles. It wasn't compelling enough to get through more than 40 pages. I might hang onto it and skim in the future.

    • Amy L. Campbell said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      A lot of really good information, could have used more anecdotes and may have benefitted from more in depth profiles of women currently in the whiskey business, but certainly a good brief overview of the topic.

    • Angela said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      Very interesting from a historical perspective - I didn't realize women were banned from bars, drinking, ads, etc, but actually worked in the spirits industry virtually unrecognized until recent years.

    • Joanne said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      A bit boring. I love history but this was dry. Learned a few things but so much was missing.

    • Patrick said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      Interesting, and lots of good facts and history. Writing feels dry and stiff.

    • Jen said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      What a fascinating read! bookaweekwithjen/

    • Keri said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      I loved the information in this book (especially the prohibition/bootlegger chapters). However, the writing style reminded me of an undergraduate research paper and drove me a little batty.

    • Lily said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      The book reads as a historical revue of women in whiskey. A little clunky to read at times, but very interesting and well researched.

    • Beth said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      Fascinating. The impact women have had positive and negative.

    • Janet said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      Distinguished.but a bit dry and austere.

    • Becca said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      Intriguing read on the history of women in different facets of the whiskey business; lots of great historical information.

    • Nezka said:
      Oct 18, 2018 - 00:33 AM

      Absolutely fabulous book on women's history of distillation--a must read for any whiskey enthusiast and any woman.

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