If Kids Ran the World

Two time Caldecott Medalists Leo and Diane Dillon show children playfully creating a generous, peaceful world where everyone shares with others.All roads lead to kindness in this powerful final collaboration between Leo and Diane Dillon In a colorful tree house, a rainbow of children determine the most important needs in our complex world, and following spreads preseTwo time Caldecott Medalists Leo and Diane Dillon show children playfully creating a generous, peaceful world where everyone shares with others.All roads lead to kindness in this powerful final collaboration between Leo and Diane Dillon In a colorful tree house, a rainbow of children determine the most important needs in our complex world, and following spreads present boys and girls happily helping others Kids bring abundant food to the hungry medicine and cheer to the sick safe housing, education, and religious tolerance to all and our planet is treated with care Forgiveness and generosity are seen as essential, because kids know how to share, and they understand the power of love.The book closes with examples of fun ways to help others along with FDR s Four Freedoms and The Second Bill of Rights, which illuminate these concepts.A tribute to peace and a celebration of diverse cultures, this last collaboration by the Dillons captures the wondrous joy of all people, and the unique beauty within each one of us shines forth If kids ran the world, it would be a better place for grown ups, too.
If Kids Ran the World Two time Caldecott Medalists Leo and Diane Dillon show children playfully creating a generous peaceful world where everyone shares with others All roads lead to kindness in this powerful final collab

  • Title: If Kids Ran the World
  • Author: Leo Dillon Diane Dillon
  • ISBN: 9780545441964
  • Page: 176
  • Format: Hardcover
    • [PDF] Download ☆ If Kids Ran the World | by ☆ Leo Dillon Diane Dillon
      176 Leo Dillon Diane Dillon
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ☆ If Kids Ran the World | by ☆ Leo Dillon Diane Dillon
      Posted by:Leo Dillon Diane Dillon
      Published :2018-06-25T00:03:40+00:00

    About the Author

    Leo Dillon Diane Dillon

    Leo Dillon Diane Dillon Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the If Kids Ran the World book, this is one of the most wanted Leo Dillon Diane Dillon author readers around the world.

    684 Comment

    • Lisa said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      A few years back, I sat in a school library and organised new books into different genres and categories. The school psychologist happened to be in the room as well when this picture book, donated by generous people, fell into my hands.We started reading together, and with every page we turned, we looked more and more confused, then annoyed, and at last just disgusted."Do these authors know ANYTHING about children?" the psychologist asked, frowning at the sugar sweet utopia shown on each page, m [...]

    • Megan said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      Very disappointing. I found it pointless and insipid.

    • Emily said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      "If Kids Ran the World" is an uplifting story about children and youth around the world. The story talks about what the world would be like if kids ran the world. For example, children would make sure that everyone would go to a nice school where classes would be exciting and fun. They would also make sure that the forests would be planted and protected. In the end it asks, "If kids ran the world, would these things be possible?" The authors say yes because kids know how to share and how to do t [...]

    • Peacegal said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      This is a book that not only presents a wishful scenario (kids being in charge of all of society), but also a wishful view of what childhood is like. It reminds me of the sort of children's book that would most likely be found in the early 1970s, optimistic to a naive degree. In the Dillons' world, if kids were in charge, there would be no bullying, no exclusion, no teasing those who look different. People would always be generous and share what they own. However, anyone who remembers their own [...]

    • Tim Vandenberg said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      The final collaboration of the 2-time Caldecott Medal (1976 & 1977) winning duo of Leo & Diane Dillon (Leo passed away in 2012), this is undoubtedly a beautiful work of art, expressing the simple, idealistic longings of all humankind: a perfect world with no problems whatsoeverAnd that's where we go from 4 stars to 3: This book is just a bit too simplistic and/or idealistic. It's goals are correctBut it assumes all kids come from healthy, loving, flawless families who raise perfect child [...]

    • Mari Miyagi said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      Although I don't like the picture very much; it's not fun or exciting, but the story would be good for older grade level students to think about what they could do to make the world a better place. There are a lot of good examples for children to think about and it might be good to use as a writing prompt. I would have students create a chart to organize the ideas from the book and think of/discuss more ideas on their own. I also think this is a good resource to teach the second conditional lang [...]

    • Elizabeth said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      I'm rather more cynical than I thought so I had mental eye rolls, but is a nice sentiment and I liked the art

    • Abdulrahman mzm said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      I love this book because it teaches us how to take care of our world proply

    • Bvlmc Buchanan Verplanck Elementary School said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      This uplifting and idealistic story takes a look at how the world could be different if we were all our best selves each day and practiced the lessons we teach our children: love, forgiveness, sharing and generosity are life affirming and life changing practices. What adults may find inspiring is the note to parents and teachers sharing the author's inspiration: Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Second Bill of Rights" and "Four Essential Human Freedoms".

    • Miss Pippi the Librarian said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      If Kids Ran the World it would be full of love and caring and kindness.Could be read with the book "Peace, Baby!" by Linda Ashman, illustrated by Joanne Lew-Vriethoff.Reviewed from a library copy.

    • AMY said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      Great story to discuss with kids regarding how to make a positive difference in the world. Highly recommended Gr. K-5.

    • Becky said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      If Kids Ran The World is saturated in lessons. It's just dripping with moral messages. It's not that the message of peace and love and joy and harmony are bad. But as the Peppa Pig episode, "International Day" CLEARLY shows, "Peace and harmony in all the world," is not easily achieved even among children, or especially among children.The book's premise is that children are more mature than adults. That somehow children are more innocent, more kind, more forgiving, more loving, more sensitive, mo [...]

    • Jane LoBosco said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      I absolutely loved this book, and think that it is a must have in every single classroom. This book teaches so many valuable lessons, and helps to instill great principles in children. If every teacher read this book to their classroom, the kids would be much more accepting and loving. This book shows what kind of world we would live in if children were in charge. I really think that the kids would love this book, and see what they could do if they were in charge. This book shows the kindness th [...]

    • Julie said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      From the title, I expected this book to be a fun, silly story, with ideas such as " would be served every day for lunch." Instead, the thoughts on each page focus on very lofty ideals like "No matter how sick people were, they would have the medicine they needed," most of which no kid or adult could really accomplish. That being said, the messages or morals on each page are decent ones, and it could be nice to read through with a child asking "how could we do this?", or just pointing to the mult [...]

    • Cynthia Daniels said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      Written in a poetic format, this beautifully illustrated book denotes what the world would be like, if kids ran the world. This book guarantees good food, plenty of picnics, funny books and games. People whould spend more time playing and less time worrying. According to this book, the stress would be off of the adults and the students would make a better world for us all. School classes will be original and fun, and everyone could dress as they wished to dress. All of the illustrations are brig [...]

    • Mattathias said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      Beautifully illustrated, with a utopian text based heavily on a distinct adult idealization of childhood, mixed with the aims of an FDR-style liberalism (his four freedoms take center stage at several points, and attribution is given in the back matter). I find Janusz Korczak's vision of a nation ruled by children more likely-- idealistic in some ways but just as chaotic and prone to disorder and collapse as a world ruled by adults. In my experience, children do not need to be taught to bully, o [...]

    • Kimberly Yelick said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      This book is about imagining anything is possible. From a kids perspective it's simple. People should share, be kind, help other and forgive. I think this book sets a wonderful example for students to follow. It reminds them that love and acceptance are things every one deserves and should receive in a way that is relatable to them. I love this book it should be in every classroom.A good activity for this book would be to have the students draw a picture of themselves doing something they would [...]

    • Colette said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      Wow, no more Leo & Diane Dillon books. That will be sad. This is a great book for beginning a discussion on what kids want out of life. This book could be a speech for a beauty queen, world peace, feed the world, but it goes much deeper. This is a thought provoking book about what we can do, how we can act, how we, or kids can be different to help the world be the best place. Altruistic, yes, but shouldn't our children exude altruism? We should have free speech, beliefs, and freedom from wan [...]

    • June Pecchia said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      What more could we ask of an inspirational children's book? Gorgeous art with text that celebrates children's pure hearts, giving nature and joie de vivre. If I were a teacher now (retired, June 2014), I'd use this to have each child create a book of how things would be if he or she ran the world. This could be done also in pairs, trios, or other small groups collaboratively.Read "If Kids Ran the World" to spread hope in yourself and among othersotnote: Sadly, this is the last book Leo and Diane [...]

    • Cara Byrne said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      A joyful book about how children would care for the world and each other in a very different way if given reign. I appreciate the inclusivity in text and pictures, though I question the appropriateness of the child in native American dress on the page featuring a princess, deep sea diver, and captain all playing "dress up." Debbie Reese's important work has made me more sensitive to the "playing Indian" trope in children's literature, and I fear this is an example of it in an otherwise inclusive [...]

    • Samantha said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      This idealized vision of the world if children were in charge includes such precepts as no bullying, taking care of the earth, and sharing food to end world hunger. The text and ideas presented are good and presently possible.An afterword follows the text and reads like a persuasive essay on the topic whereas I was hoping for more bullet points and information on ways to put some of these principles into practice now. A note to parents and teachers reveals the authors inspiration in writing on t [...]

    • Liz said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      M.m.m Of course everything mentioned in this book is what one would wish for the world. It feels like there could be more to it Even in the back matter where more things that kids are doing are just mentioned, maybe there could be actual specifics of what and where kids have contributed. Leo Dillion's last work makes this bittersweet. I did really like this wish, "Everyone would learn the happiness of being thankful."

    • Heidi said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      I found this book beautiful, not only in the ideals that it represents but the charming illustrations. Yes, as others have noted, kids are far from perfect and they struggle with selfishness and other things, but shouldn't we strive for a better world? I think the purpose of the book is to help readers realize that they can make a difference in the world. If you're looking for something more specific, try Pay it Forward Kids: Small Acts, Big Change by Nancy Runstedler.

    • Barbara said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      Lively colors enhance a reassuring message that the world might be better off in the hands of children. Although there isn't much that is new or unfamiliar here, it's neat to see all the scenes in which children are making sure everyone has food to eat, a place to stay, and much love. As I read the book, I couldn't keep myself from wishing that all children enjoyed school and had someone who loved them. It would surely make for a kinder, gentler place.

    • Courtney Leive said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      If you want to read about what kids would do if they ran the world, this book is for you. I really like the point of views in this book. I also liked how the kids responded to the world around them. If kids truly ran the world, I know for a fact it would be better, more fun, and equal. Learn more about what kids would do when running the world because they truly have some great ideas, open up the book and see.

    • Theresa said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      The illustrations of the children are a bit creepy. The text peddles idealistic cliches in the most earnest fashion and seems only concerned with being didactic rather than engaging or appealing to kids. I could see this being used with kindergartners in starting to explore social issues like bullying and world peace or as a jumping off point for talking about the importance of volunteering, but wouldn't recommend it as a fun or particularly profound read.

    • Dina said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      This book is a bit simplistic in the ideal world it presents, but where would we be without some vision of the ideal? I think we all long for the kind of world this book portrays. I'm sorry to realize that this will be the last book by the Dillon couple. They have left an impressive legacy, including the world they drew here.

    • Robin said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      This is a beautiful and touching swansong of one of the two illustrators. I've never read any of the Dillons' other books, but I found myself crying when I saw that Leo had passed away. I am now an instant fan, and intend to go find the rest of their body of work. If it's all as inspiring, wholesome and loving as this one, I'm in for some very happy reading.

    • Stephanie Croaning said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      I like the whimsical illustrations in the book, especially the front cover, but felt that the message of the story was too strong-handed and fell short of the goal. I believe the book was meant to point out that a world run by children would be a better place -- more fun, full of inclusion and peace. The text itself wasn't very fun; it felt way to adult and preachy.

    • Debbie Tanner said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:03 AM

      This is a lovely picture book about how kids might make the world a better place with good food, good housing and kind treatment for everyone. I guess I wonder if people thought all of those things would make the world a better place, why aren't we there now, because wouldn't people be teaching their kids these things?

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