Teaching the Dog to Read

Since the appearance of his first novel, The Land of Laughs, in 1980, Jonathan Carroll has been one of the most compelling, consistently versatile storytellers in modern imaginative literature His extraordinary new novella, Teaching the Dog to Read, is quintessential Carroll surprising, funny, and filled with unexpected moments and astonishing revelations The story openSince the appearance of his first novel, The Land of Laughs, in 1980, Jonathan Carroll has been one of the most compelling, consistently versatile storytellers in modern imaginative literature His extraordinary new novella, Teaching the Dog to Read, is quintessential Carroll surprising, funny, and filled with unexpected moments and astonishing revelations The story opens when mid level office drone Tony Areal receives an extravagant gift the Lichtenberg wristwatch he has always coveted Shortly afterward, he receives an even grander gift the luxurious and expensive Porsche Cayman that has always been the car of his dreams Accompanying the car is the mysterious Alice, who knows about Tony s dreams and desires than Tony himself This encounter opens the door to a rich and unexpected universe the world behind the world Teaching the Dog to Read is set at the intersection of the mundane and the miraculous, a place where reality itself shifts and shimmers with disconcerting suddenness It begins in the realm of recognizable things and ends in a hospital room where a bizarre and invisible reunion takes place Along the way, it offers both grand entertainment and a visionary meditation on the complex connections between our dreaming and waking selves The result is a master class in the art of narrative and a permanent addition to Jonathan Carroll s remarkable body of work.
Teaching the Dog to Read Since the appearance of his first novel The Land of Laughs in Jonathan Carroll has been one of the most compelling consistently versatile storytellers in modern imaginative literature His ext

  • Title: Teaching the Dog to Read
  • Author: Jonathan Carroll
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 329
  • Format: Kindle Edition
    • Ó Teaching the Dog to Read || ¹ PDF Download by ¹ Jonathan Carroll
      329 Jonathan Carroll
    • thumbnail Title: Ó Teaching the Dog to Read || ¹ PDF Download by ¹ Jonathan Carroll
      Posted by:Jonathan Carroll
      Published :2018-04-17T17:05:44+00:00

    About the Author

    Jonathan Carroll

    Jonathan Carroll b 1949 is an award winning American author of modern fantasy and slipstream novels His debut book, The Land of Laughs 1980 , tells the story of a children s author whose imagination has left the printed page and begun to influence reality The book introduced several hallmarks of Carroll s writing, including talking animals and worlds that straddle the thin line between reality and the surreal, a technique that has seen him compared to South American magical realists.Outside the Dog Museum 1991 was named the best novel of the year by the British Fantasy Society, and has proven to be one of Carroll s most popular works Since then he has written the Crane s View trilogy, Glass Soup 2005 and, most recently, The Ghost in Love 2008 His short stories have been collected in The Panic Hand 1995 and The Woman Who Married a Cloud 2012 He continues to live and write in Vienna.

    814 Comment

    • karen said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      thank god for fox, without whom i wouldn't even have known this story existed. and it does exist. and has existed, digitally at least, since last november. and while i immediately ordered the $3.99 NOOK version upon learning of it, i also ordered the considerably more expensive signed limited edition from subterranean (only 1,000 copies - hurry up!) because my jonathan carroll collection doesn't understand e-books. and while this is only a brief novella, it has all the things you want when you'r [...]

    • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      Full review, first posted at Fantasy Literature.Anthony Areal, a forgettable, average man, trending toward wet noodle, is astonished one day to receive an anonymous gift in the mail containing the watch of his dreams: a gorgeous $9,000 Lichtenberg ‘Figure’ wristwatch. For a few minutes he’s afraid it is a dream: the watch will probably disappear or turn into a pumpkin when he touches it. But the watch stays on Tony’s arm when he puts it there, and it’s followed a week later by his fant [...]

    • Karl said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      Do we enter the dream world of Jonathan Carroll in this short novella or does the dream world enter our waking world, and it happens in the blink of an eye. Mr. Carroll works his special magic by tearing down the worlds of Night and Day causing confusion within to his characters. The trite morphs into the profound within just a few pages. Watch a master at work.If I had any complaint it would be that this book was just too short and ended just too quickly.This is copy 773 of 1000 signed and numb [...]

    • Freesiab (Bookish Review) said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      Possibly my new favorite JC book!!! Gah!! I could go on and on but this little novella is definitely worth picking up even if you aren't a super fan. Genre is magical realism and it's perfect in this book. Personally I think he wrote it just for me. Thanks JC

    • Bud Mallar said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      First, since some of this might have been way over this old man's head, you should read the review by Karen Not that she's prejudiced about the good Mr. Carroll or anything - she does gush a bit, however This is short, and way different. Almost sketchy - to use a Maine term. A wonderful read, fun, interesting, and yes, it should make you think a bit about things - although I was never scared of the ants in big shoes.Just what is real, and who controls how and what we think, act, hope and dream - [...]

    • Sandra said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      We don’t remember the dream,but the dream remembers us. —Linda PastanMy first Jonathan Carroll, and it was a weird and wonderful read.More!

    • Magulec said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      Taka opowiastka. Czyta się bardzo szybko, ale nie wiem, co mogłabym powiedzieć o tej książce. Ani napisać. Taka dziwna historia.

    • Olga said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      I love J. Carroll books, all of them but recently I fell a bit disappointed by the length of them. This story could be a part of the novel collection. I liked ot very much but it was way too short. I wish mr Carroll would describe more about the characters and put more details into this story. I wish to know more about Tonys and their past incarnations, about Alice and Lena and the consequences of their actions.Still it was a great pleasure to read and again be part of the magical world that mr. [...]

    • Amy (Other Amy) said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      We don't remember the dream,but the dream remembers us.--Linda PastanI'm into epigraphs this morning. And also, this story. Because after I finished it last night I was kind of reviewing it in my head, and then this morning I had the realization that turned the lights on, that great a-ha moment and now I can't stop smiling.That's the kind of story this is. It seems to me that Jonathan Carroll is a very generous writer, or at least he's been very generous in this story. He is not asking his reade [...]

    • Lostaccount said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      One of the worst books I've read in ages. Even though it was short, the book almost bored me to death. It's crass unadulterated nonsense, bromide sentences, hackneyed plot and completely banal and uninteresting, like most dreams told by other people. No character development, no decent setting, the dialogue is throwaway and juvenile, and the writing is sloppy. It all feels so silly and contrived, a piss poor attempt to be clever. It just couldn't hold my interest. This book belongs on my "books [...]

    • Natasha said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      I enjoyed reading this, but it felt like it could have been a lot shorter or a little fuller. Mr. Carroll has a somewhat sparse writing style, leaving the reader to fill in details on her or his own. I usually like it, but the given elements of the story didn't quite match up with it's length this time.Having said that, I'm always happy to spend time with Jonathon Carroll and the slightly off worlds he creates. I'd recommend this if you've read his other stuff, but it's not a good starting point [...]

    • Maxim said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      A gem of a story. Follows the fluid absurdity and internal illogic of dreams. Never knew where it would go next and always felt 'right'

    • Michael said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      I don't understand the low star ratings on this I thought it was spectacular, Carroll at his best.

    • Jennifer said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      I've heard short stories are harder to write than full on novels. This novella is the perfect surreal bite of fiction. At 90 pages, it's a delightful quirky read and a day of escape. I'd recommend it to anyone curious about starting to read Jonathan Carroll.

    • Kendra said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      Excellent cult-feel novella traversing the line between sleep and wakefulness. This is the Carroll story weaving I adore.

    • Stephen Gallup said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      I'm a little surprised to see the quantity of five-star reviews this little book has gotten. This is not meant to say I dislike it, but to me it has a sort of mailed-in feel. It starts with a situation suggestive of Walter Mitty, i.e a dull and unaccomplished guy begins living his dreams. From there, that character splits into Day and Night (waking and dreaming) selves, both of whom begin consciously interacting with each other and with a somewhat incoherent mixture of real and imagined events.D [...]

    • Wes said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      [Review originally appeared on SFRevu at: sfrevu/php/Review-id.p]Jonathan Carroll's writing is tricky to describe, and his books are hard to categorize. Carroll's works tend to blur the line between reality and fantasy, bringing a surrealism into stories that otherwise take place in our mundane world.Teaching the Dog to Read is no exception. The story focuses on Tony Areal, an office drone of some sort who is characterized as being nothing short of unnoticeable. But things change for Tony one da [...]

    • Scott said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      I really enjoyed Jonathan Carroll's novella Teaching the Dog to Read. It is a dreams meet reality story with a bit of a twist to that. Where I was slightly disappointed with this story compared to all of Carroll's novels that I have read was there were a bit too many, and too large gaps in this story where I felt a lot more important detail could have been added. Again, this isn't a full length novel, so maybe I should be taking that into consideration. I just felt there were too many times wher [...]

    • Barbara Bryant said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      Another lovely, focused short story by Jonathan Carroll, with a cameo by Arlen Ford. The merging of waking self and dreaming self is something I have explored since I was 7 years old, so the magic in this book wasn't so much about the idea but rather the journey that commences.But why the title? Part of the literal answer is on page 27: "Start by teaching them the alphabet." The building blocks eventually lay together in recognizable patterns, which lead to words, concepts, and on to the rich la [...]

    • Audrey said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      One of the things I love most about Jonathan Carroll novels is how they are full of the things he loves; there's a palpable sense of joy and love for things, for places, for people, and I love that it comes through in his writing. In a lot of ways, that's kind of what this novel is about -- and I love that it's told with the sense of wonder and even appreciation that comes through in Carroll novels. Upon re-reading what I just wrote, it sounds like a bunch of rambling, but maybe if you read this [...]

    • Kelly Furniss said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      Jonathan Carroll uses this 90 page novella to make us as readers inside our own minds examine complex subjects as love, grief, death and the afterlife/reincarnation but it's handled gently with unexpected moments you could never think up and elements of absurd whacky humour. One of the other main themes is the complex connections between our dreaming and waking selves where reality can then suddenly become surreal and surrealism is where this author excels. I only did not rate it at 5 stars as I [...]

    • Serge Pierro said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      I'm always happy to read a new release by Jonathan Carroll, as he never disappoints. This time he has written a short novella that is sadly over before you know it. The typical Carroll musings are present throughout, yet due to its length he doesn't have the opportunity to explore them in depth like his other works. Fans will want to read it, but first time readers would be better off reading some of his earlier works to see what he is really capable of.

    • Laurie said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      I feel like Jonathan Carrol is no longer taking the time to develop his characters or a coherent story and just launching immediately into a magical stage as a device to pontificate on his thoughts on life. His characters are all the same and even his ideas, which were once so original and unique ate sounding hackneyed and forced. Very disappointing.

    • Reece said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      This was a neat little book. Tony Areal is an office worker with a relatively mundane life who stumbles onto a more active role in his dreams. It's a very short, concise book, with lots of intriguing concepts about the conscious and unconscious mind, and the nature of life and death. I highly recommend it.

    • Christopher Nekolny said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      Ever wondered what your dream self is like? As in, the you who populates your dreams but isn't quite you? Then this book will be for you. As always, Jonathan writes an amazing, mind bending story that makes you wonder about reality, love and the glory of words

    • Adrienne said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      Super quick read - only 90 pages - but a great story. What an idea!

    • Brad said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      EBR - love

    • Sara Leigh said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      A gem of a novella. A perfect dip into the mind of Jonathan Carroll, full of the usual surreal fantastic things he dreams up.

    • Jason said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      Classic Jonathan Carroll - a splendid, just left-of-center, read. Not as monumental as his full length novels, but enough to capture the magic of his style.

    • Fantasy Literature said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:05 PM

      Teaching the Dog to Read: A surreal trip4 stars from Tadiana at FANTASY LITERATURE

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