Reading Picture Books With Children: How to Shake Up Storytime and Get Kids Talking about What They See

A new, interactive approach to storytime, The Whole Book Approach was developed in conjunction with the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art and expert author Megan Dowd Lambert s graduate work in children s literature at Simmons College, offering a practical guide for reshaping storytime and getting kids to think with their eyes Traditional storytime often offers a passA new, interactive approach to storytime, The Whole Book Approach was developed in conjunction with the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art and expert author Megan Dowd Lambert s graduate work in children s literature at Simmons College, offering a practical guide for reshaping storytime and getting kids to think with their eyes Traditional storytime often offers a passive experience for kids, but the Whole Book approach asks the youngest of readers to ponder all aspects of a picture book and to use their critical thinking skills Using classic examples, Megan asks kids to think about why the trim size of Ludwig Bemelman s Madeline is so generous, or why the typeset in David Wiesner s Caldecott winner,The Three Pigs, appears to twist around the page, or why books like Chris Van Allsburg s The Polar Express and Eric Carle s The Very Hungry Caterpillar are printed landscape instead of portrait The dynamic discussions that result from this shared reading style range from the profound to the hilarious and will inspire adults to make children s responses to text, art, and design an essential part of storytime.
Reading Picture Books With Children How to Shake Up Storytime and Get Kids Talking about What They See A new interactive approach to storytime The Whole Book Approach was developed in conjunction with the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art and expert author Megan Dowd Lambert s graduate work in ch

  • Title: Reading Picture Books With Children: How to Shake Up Storytime and Get Kids Talking about What They See
  • Author: Megan Dowd Lambert Laura Vaccaro Seeger
  • ISBN: 9781580896627
  • Page: 455
  • Format: Hardcover
    • Free Read [Nonfiction Book] ↠ Reading Picture Books With Children: How to Shake Up Storytime and Get Kids Talking about What They See - by Megan Dowd Lambert Laura Vaccaro Seeger ↠
      455 Megan Dowd Lambert Laura Vaccaro Seeger
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Nonfiction Book] ↠ Reading Picture Books With Children: How to Shake Up Storytime and Get Kids Talking about What They See - by Megan Dowd Lambert Laura Vaccaro Seeger ↠
      Posted by:Megan Dowd Lambert Laura Vaccaro Seeger
      Published :2018-06-09T17:22:53+00:00

    About the Author

    Megan Dowd Lambert Laura Vaccaro Seeger

    Megan Dowd Lambert Laura Vaccaro Seeger Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Reading Picture Books With Children: How to Shake Up Storytime and Get Kids Talking about What They See book, this is one of the most wanted Megan Dowd Lambert Laura Vaccaro Seeger author readers around the world.

    330 Comment

    • Pam ☼Because Someone Must Be a Thorn☼ Tee said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      I love reading and I love reading *with* children so this book was a natural choice for me.While reading it I found both things that were familiar and things that were not. I've shared wordless books with children, specifically to draw them out and get them to tell me the story. And I've gone over the parts of the book on a mega-level. Which is to say that I've pointed out the elements of the title page, the page numbers, table of contents and index and that sort of thing. What I never thought t [...]

    • Asia said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      Not all professional books about reading and reading with children are easy to read. Much to the theme of the book, this book feels more like a conversation than a professional lecture. Previously, there were times in my storytime where I ask kids about what they think might happen next based on the picture and other interactive questions -- but after or really during reading this I began to slow down more and try to point out specific design and illustration choices and ask kids questions-- let [...]

    • Penelope said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      Aspects I liked about this book:-Lambert spends time discussing aspects of art, text, subject, and layout of picture books and ways to engage children in story time.-The book is laid out like a picture book, with illustrations, glossy pages, and easy to read text. These design elements draw the reader into the book, and complement its topic. Aspects I really didn't like about the book:-Lambert has created a new vs. old paradigm of picture book reading that is very exaggerated. She implies that n [...]

    • Niki Marion said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      Required reading for anyone who reads picturebooks with children and those who read picturebooks with themselves, too. An incredible resource for teachers, librarians, and booksellers to reinvigorate how they see picturebooks and those books' intended audiences.Lambert focuses on how to encourage the child reader to share their thoughts by providing them with a toolkit about how to look at and think about a picturebook as a whole art object, from cover to cover and everything in between. She als [...]

    • Kris Patrick said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      Six stars please!Reading aloud can absolutely be an inquiry based learning experience.Need to find the right wording possible upper arm tattoo? Hmmm

    • Melinda said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      I'm on the fence. I love the concept of making storytime less of a performance and more of a conversation/joint exploration. And I *really* love focusing on building and nurturing a relationship between kids and books, not to earn points or take tests but to have fun. Anyone who knows me knows exactly how I feel about AR (spoiler: it's the literal worst). I guess I'm just not sure that talking to preschoolers about endpapers is the way I want to go. I mostly do toddler storytimes so I'm also not [...]

    • Georgene said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      This book is a quick read with many surprises about reading picture books with children and teaching them about the parts of the book that interact with the illustrations to help tell the story on a child's level. Adults readers may be more engaged in reading the text and not giving the illustrations as much attention, but young listeners are more engrossed in the illustrations and will often see things that surprise the adults. Anyone who reads to children should read this book.

    • Becky said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      I appreciated this read much more than Supercharged Storytime. This offers realistic instead of overwhelming teaching methods in a way that makes them not seem like teaching methods but just an insightful way to share a picture book. I'm someone who's still wary of so many questions interrupting the flow of the story, but I'm going to challenge myself to add more questioning to my storytime approach and just see how it goes.

    • Brooke said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      This book opened my mind to a new way of thinking about sharing picture books with children. While I have problems getting this to work in my storytime it certainly has caused me to call attention to the art work and to remember to value the comments and ideas of children.

    • Jeanne said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      All my librarian friends should read this book. I learned a lot!

    • Brandy said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      A useful approach to storytimes, but--contrary to the premise--certainly not the only way. It's a way of running storytime as an interactive discussion of art and books (which is great and valuable) rather than as a performance (which is also valuable in different ways). Good information and technique for presenting picture books, complete with the proper lingo to discuss it, but wrapped in a slightly off-putting This Is The True Way package. Thinking on some of the ideas for an upcoming class, [...]

    • Katy said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      This book brings some really great ideas to the table for storytimes with Lambert's Whole Book Approach. In general, I felt the text could have been more succinct as well as go into more depth for those attempting to incorporate this approach into storytimes. Strangely, I couldn't really see an audience for this book aside from other educators/librarians/etc who lead storytime and yet the book contained a lot of anecdotal evidence rather than instruction on how to become comfortable leading a gr [...]

    • Jennifer said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      A different way of approaching picture books and storytime. It's definitely got me thinking of new ways I can share picture books with older kids and can do one-one-readings with my nephews. A little academic in tone, and I'll likely stick to more of a "performance" storytime with my larger library groups, but interesting and not-too-long professional reading.

    • Alison T. Johnson said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      I guess this book is for those who are really unfamiliar with picture books and sharing them with children. So much of it seems obvious. I appreciate that she learned so much from the children she interacted with- that just reinforces her own message about truly listening to kids. Children are far more perceptive than many adults are willing to admit.

    • Teri said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      This book had some really great thoughts that I hadn't considered before. Overall however, I was a little underwhelmed. A lot of the book is just stories about things kids have said to her as she has been reading various books. I would have thought it would be a bit more insightful.

    • Jess said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      4.5

    • Lizz Martensen said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      A fine book, it didn't present much information I didn't already know, but it was interesting. Note: Professional Read

    • Sasha Kinney said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      Great foundation for dissecting a picture book through illustrations. It could have been expanded with details and examples.

    • Anna Smithberger said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      The whole book approach won't work for all storytimes, at least not in a super detailed, go over everything way, but so important. Great book, fast read, killer insight.

    • Suburban Homeschooler said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      Lots of interesting and unique details in the putting together of children's books.

    • Samantha said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      Great book about whole book storytime. Really got me thinking about ways I can identify the book in its form to children. A quick read, and should be read by most librarians.

    • Scott Fillner said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      Wonderful book with exact vocabulary to use with students. It is a great book to utilize if you partake in #bookaday or #classroombookaday

    • Jill Berry said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      Great ideas about how to read books interactively with children, especially focusing on visual literacy.

    • Cynthia said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      I loved this book! I learned so much, and it has completely changed how I read picture books aloud.

    • Lori said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      Gave me new things to notice and talk about when doing read alouds with kids.

    • W.H. Beck said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      "Just as children need to develop print awareness and other skills to be able to decode text and achieve fluency in their reading of words, learning to read pictures is a skill that develops over time and exposure." Megan Down Lambert's "Whole Book Approach" to reading aloud emphasizes the art and design of picture books and how they visually impact our reading experience. A practical professional book for teachers and librarians who read aloud and want to incorporate visual literacy (which is m [...]

    • Pop Bop said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      An Interesting Book With Wide AppealFor a committed academic I guess this book could qualify as a technical monograph. For a student of early childhood education or children's literature or maybe library science I could see this book being required reading on almost any syllabus. But the best part is that for the enthusiast, parent, home schooler, or just general reader this book is loaded with thought provoking ideas about what books are and how they could be or should be introduced to early re [...]

    • Erica said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      If you are looking for ways you can get kids to be more conscious of their intellectual and emotional responses to picture books and converse about them during story time, this book is for you. I, on the other hand, spent the entire book figuring out whether or not I might get anything out of it without subscribing to her entire scheme, which was an annoying challenge. Clearly, every children's librarian knows that some things are better left for one-on-one reading than for story time. For me, t [...]

    • Marianne said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      Excellent and well-written book on fresh and inspiring ways to explore children's picture books. Highly recommended for librarians, educators, parents and caregivers who share books with children. Megan Dowd Lambert includes practical examples of how to incorporate the Whole Book Approach.

    • Annie said:
      Sep 18, 2018 - 17:22 PM

      The subtitle of Reading Picture Books with Children is "how to shake up storytime and get kids talking about what they see." Lambert discusses at length the technique she pioneered of exploring picture book artwork with children and allowing them time to discuss and process what they see in addition to the words on the page. She discusses the many parts of a book that can be discussed with children, beginning with the physical qualities of the book itself such as its size, the jacket, the cover, [...]

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