Players: The Story of Sports and Money and the Visionaries Who Fought to Create a Revolution

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The business of sports has been completely transformed over the course of my lifetime, and Players is a riveting behind the scenes look at the beginnings of that revolution I couldn t put it down Billy BeaneThe astonishing untold story of the people who transformed sports, in the span of a single generation, from a job that required top athletNEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The business of sports has been completely transformed over the course of my lifetime, and Players is a riveting behind the scenes look at the beginnings of that revolution I couldn t put it down Billy BeaneThe astonishing untold story of the people who transformed sports, in the span of a single generation, from a job that required top athletes to work in the off season to make ends meet into a massive global business.In the cash soaked world of contemporary sports, where every season brings news of higher salaries, endorsement deals, and television contracts, it is mind boggling to remember that as recently as the 1970s elite athletes earned so little money that many were forced to work second jobs in the off season Roger Staubach, for example, made only 25,000 in his first season as the starting quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys and wound up selling commercial real estate during the summer Today, when Fortune reports that every athlete on its Top 50 list makes than twenty million dollar per year, it s clear that a complete reversal of power has occurred right before our eyes.Players is the first book to tell the astonishing narrative behind the creation of the modern sports business a true revolution that moved athletes from the bottom of the financial pyramid to the top It started in 1960, when a young Cleveland lawyer named Mark McCormack convinced a young golfer named Arnold Palmer to sign with him McCormack simply believed that the best athletes had commercial value than they realized and he was right Before long, he raised Palmer s annual off the course income from 5,000 to 500,000 and forever changed the landscape of the sports world.In Players, veteran Wall Street Journal sports reporter Matthew Futterman introduces a wide ranging cast of characters to tell the story of the athletes, agents, TV executives, and league officials who together created the dominating and multifaceted sports industry we know today Beginning with Palmer and McCormack s historic partnership, Players features details of the landmark moments of sports that have never been revealed before, including how legendary Wide World of Sports producer Roone Arledge realized that the way to win viewers was to blend sports and human drama the 1973 Wimbledon boycott, when eighty one of the top tennis players in the world protested the suspension of Nikola Pilic and baseball pitcher Catfish Hunter s battle to become MLB s first free agent.Players is a gripping, fly on the wall account of the creation and rise of the modern sports world and the people who fought to make it happen From the professionalization of the Olympics to the outsize influence of companies like IMG, Nike, and ESPN, this fascinating book details the wild evolution of sports into the extravaganza we experience today, and the inevitable trade offs those changes have wrought.
Players The Story of Sports and Money and the Visionaries Who Fought to Create a Revolution NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The business of sports has been completely transformed over the course of my lifetime and Players is a riveting behind the scenes look at the beginnings of that revolution I

  • Title: Players: The Story of Sports and Money and the Visionaries Who Fought to Create a Revolution
  • Author: Matthew Futterman
  • ISBN: 9781476716954
  • Page: 461
  • Format: Hardcover
    • Best Read [Matthew Futterman] ☆ Players: The Story of Sports and Money and the Visionaries Who Fought to Create a Revolution || [Historical Fiction Book] PDF Ä
      461 Matthew Futterman
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Matthew Futterman] ☆ Players: The Story of Sports and Money and the Visionaries Who Fought to Create a Revolution || [Historical Fiction Book] PDF Ä
      Posted by:Matthew Futterman
      Published :2018-04-16T03:24:33+00:00

    About the Author

    Matthew Futterman

    Matthew Futterman Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Players: The Story of Sports and Money and the Visionaries Who Fought to Create a Revolution book, this is one of the most wanted Matthew Futterman author readers around the world.

    934 Comment

    • Ted Lehmann said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      Players: The Story of Sports and Money, and the Visionaries Who Fought to Create a Revolution by Matthew Futterman (Simon & Schuster, 2016, 336 pages, $17.63, 12.99) tells the story of how the business interests of both athletes, their agents, and sponsors worked to wrest control of sports and athletics from the hands of team owners and rich, socially prominent “guardians” of the pure amateurism of more gentlemanly sports, thus changing both the emphasis and the economics of sports forev [...]

    • Judy Collins said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      A special thank you to Simon & Schuster and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.Bold impressive cover!Matthew Futterman,a senior special writer for sports with the Wall Street Journal; who better to tell readers of this incredible journey-PLAYERS,The Story of Sports and Money, and the Visionaries Who Fought to Create a Revolution a well-researched, gripping and insightful look at "big business" American professional sports industry. From the fiftiesto the essential shift in [...]

    • Matt said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      Major league sports is big business. I don't think any metrics or factoids are necessary as this is a rather uncontroversial and unsurprising assertion. What's more interesting is that this wasn't always the case. Major ballplayers often had to supplement their relatively meager athletic incomes with side pursuits until fairly recently. For example, Roger Staubach earned less as the rookie starting quarterback of the Dallas Cowboys than author Matthew Futterman's father did working as an assista [...]

    • Allen Adams said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      themaineedge/sports/doSports fans have long become accustomed to the massive amounts of money that are inherently part of professional sports. Whether we’re talking about the huge salaries paid to athletes or the immense television deals or the exponentially growing sums required to purchase teams, money is simply everywhere in pro sports.However, it wasn’t always that way.Veteran sportswriter Matthew Futterman offers a look at the evolution of the sporting economy in “Players”. It’s a [...]

    • Mary said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      I'm a baseball fan(atic), love football, tolerate basketball, and for years I've been slightly appalled at the amount of money the players make. Contracts for $300 MILLION? Are you kidding me? They play a GAME, for goodness sake; not perform life-saving medical miracles or something morally brilliant. While I still think it's an awful lot of lettuce, after reading this book (among several) I understand that it's not that simple, and that for years players of professional sports were exploited fo [...]

    • Don Gorman said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      (2 1/2) This is a case history book for serious sports enthusiasts and business folk. I was pretty familiar with several of files. The creation of the sports agent/content provider/800 pound gorilla IMG was a history I had studied in the past. I was pretty familiar with the Catfish Hunter story as well. All of that being said, this is a really good reference piece for anyone interested in how the business of sports marketing and the massive generation of dollars it has created. Some of the side [...]

    • Ruth said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      An interesting exposition of how we went from athletes barely making enough money to cover rent & food in the 1960's to the mega earnings they are showered with in more recent times. Very interesting read.

    • Ashley Mills said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      Really fascinating book about the sports industy and how it became the money-maker that it is.

    • Michael Minns said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      Summer reading

    • Gregg said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      Appeals to my interest in the variety of ways people, companies, and industries make money. The mechanism is no surprise--selling sports stars and a compelling story about their "heroism" in sports and/or life--but the evolution of big money in sports is interesting. Looks like we primarily have golfer Arnold Palmer to thank for ushering big money into sports which, the author argues, gave elite athletes the ability to train and play their sport full time. This made their play even better, which [...]

    • Carly said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      I loved it!!! It is a very revealing and readable account of the intersection between big sports and big business. It just hard to fathom in world where athletes get multi-million dollar contracts before they play even one professional game that pro-athletes once upon a time were not super rich and had to work in the off season to make ends meet. Overall, very fascinating and enjoyable to read. Since the epilogue was about the U.S Women National Soccer team I am hoping that Matthew Futterman wri [...]

    • Paul Miller said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      Great story of how sports became big business. The pioneering work of Mark McCormick in golf lit the spark, but the story was then repeated in parallel, sport by sport. For example, I never realized professionalism was introduced (formally) into the Olympics b/c the czars of the sport needed 'stars' to emerge over multiple Olympics to drive US ratings and hence higher rights fees - US media rights being the mother's milk of the whole thing. Strong recommendation.

    • Jason said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      A solid read with some good insights on how the ownership side of pro sports has functioned. However, there are some glaring omissions of the labor side, including not a single mention of the most important figure in free agency in Curt Flood. Reads a bit too cynical when it comes to labor, but fairly spot on in regards to management/ownership.

    • Josh said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      Good read on the business of sports and how it evolved from purely sport to a money-driven business. Goes from Mark McCormack (IMG founder) and his relationship with Arnold Palmer to Edwin Moses, Phil Knight and several others who were key to the evolution of the way sports leagues/owners and athletes interacted with one another. An interesting read but not amazing.

    • Mark Pace said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      I didn't end up making it all the way through this. I made it a little over halfway and gave up. I tried and tried, but I found myself bored every time I tried to read it. It's about an interesting topic I usually enjoy reading about, and there was certainly some good information, but it's just not an appealing read.

    • Jowanza Joseph said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      This book is an unique and insightful look at how money got into sports. I enjoyed all of the research and anecdotes that put this book together in a cohesive package. Some of the anecdotes stretched a bit too long for my taste but overall it was fun read. I would only recommend for people who watch sports regularly, anyone else might find themselves bored for long stretches of it.

    • Erika said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      This is an informative book about the story behind how modern sports came to equal big money, and who gets the share of the financial pie.I received a copy through Good Reads First Reads, definitely a must read for those interested in the world of sports.

    • Patrick said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      A good read, even though it was almost solely focussed on the US, with only brief mentions of what was happening in the rest of the world. The author, by telling the stories of individuals in several different sports, gave a strong sense of the changes that were happening.

    • Ken Megale said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      This is a well written synopsis of the high points in the history of the commercialization of sports. It ends beautifully with a chapter on the American Women's soccer team. Ken Megale

    • Gray said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      This was a very interesting book. I enjoyed reading about these people & these situations. I can recommend it.

    • Lance said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      Very good stories on money and sportsny different sports are covered. Fuller review to come.

    • Robert Deaton said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      This was an easy and entertaining read.

    • Becky said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      3.5

    • Eli said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      Excellent insight into the world of sports and marketing. Very informative. Highly recommend it!

    • Matt said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      Amazing how far sports marketing has come on the last 50 years! Glad the players are getting their fair share but we seem to have created a monster! Loved the section on Arnie Palmer!

    • Laura said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      Very well done. I now have a much better understanding of the money side of sports and how we got to where we are today.

    • Ryan said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      Interesting look at attempts in the last 60 years to drive money toward the talent in sports - and the second-order effects of success in those attempts.

    • Dash Williams said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      It's interesting early on, but falls off a cliff when the author begins to drone on about the purity of sports.

    • Zach said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 03:24 AM

      A very average book. I don't regret reading it; I wouldn't recommend it. Lots of interesting anecdotesbut most just different ways of saying things I've heard before.

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