What's Yours Is Mine: Against the Sharing Economy

Tom Slee


What's Yours Is Mine: Against the Sharing Economy

What's Yours Is Mine: Against the Sharing Economy

  • Title: What's Yours Is Mine: Against the Sharing Economy
  • Author: Tom Slee
  • ISBN: 9781682190227
  • Page: 354
  • Format: Paperback



The news is full of their names, supposedly the vanguard of a rethinking of capitalism Lyft, Airbnb, Taskrabbit, Uber, and many companies have a mandate of disruption and upending the old order and they ve succeeded in effecting the biggest change in the American workforce in over a century, according to former Secretary of Labor Robert Reich.But this new wave ofThe news is full of their names, supposedly the vanguard of a rethinking of capitalism Lyft, Airbnb, Taskrabbit, Uber, and many companies have a mandate of disruption and upending the old order and they ve succeeded in effecting the biggest change in the American workforce in over a century, according to former Secretary of Labor Robert Reich.But this new wave of technology companies is funded and steered by very old school venture capitalists And in What s Yours Is Mine, technologist Tom Slee argues the so called sharing economy damages development, extends harsh free market practices into previously protected areas of our lives, and presents the opportunity for a few people to make fortunes by damaging communities and pushing vulnerable individuals to take on unsustainable risk.Drawing on original empirical research, Slee shows that the friendly language of sharing, trust, and community masks a darker reality.


Recent Comments "What's Yours Is Mine: Against the Sharing Economy"

I am not an Economist but I am involved in economy more often as a consumer and sometimes a producer. I am in awe of how the author breaks down "sharing economy" and how he uses examples of innovations that are well known like Uber and AirBnB.It is true that the sharing economy does appeal to ideals like equality, the essence of community and sustainability and it is also true that these companies or stakeholders use the same ideals to make massive private fortunes and we ought to question all t [...]

Básicamente explica cómo la revolución de la economía colaborativa en realidad es una revolución libertarianista, incluso nos cuenta como más de una de sus principales figuras idolatran a Ayn Rand (el CEO de Uber, por ejemplo).La economía colaborativa no se trata de una nueva revolución industrial, sino de una revolución libertarianista. De la revolución de empresas expertas en evasión fiscal, empresas que tampoco pagan impuestos, que no aseguran ni dan garantías de ningún tipo a em [...]

Interesante crítica a las grandes empresas de la Economía colaborativa, a su falta de responsabilidad y a las presiones desreguladoras que están ejerciendo en todo el mundo.Un libro desmitificador de las supuestas bondades de Uber, Airbnb y otros.

It used to be quite common for people to draw a distinction between the online world and what they called “the real world”. Indeed, judging by the way some people put just about every aspect of their private lives on social media, not everyone understands even today that that distinction is a false one.If you harbour any doubts about this, consider the so-called “sharing economy”. Armed with just a smartphone and a few well-chosen apps, you can arrange to have your home cleaned, a meal d [...]

Here is a book that looks under the covers at what the "Sharing Economy" is and how it is causing undermining regulated businesses. This isn't a happy picture. The original ideals of sharing have been subverted by for-profit businesses. What used to be fair and for extra cash is now full time (or more) employment for those doing the work. The companies involved don't really care, that is what is most evident from the first sources. Everything is on the shoulders of either the service provider (i [...]

Must read for technology advocatesUnless you're not planning to live in the society that "sharing economy" platforms are creating (spoiler: they don't really give you a choice) you should know their moral limits from implementational shortcomings - something Mr. Slee is very concisely pointing out in this book.

I thought I didn’t need to read What’s Yours is Mine, Against the Sharing Economy.  I felt instinctively that AirBnB and Uber were a bad idea, and I’ve never used them.  But lots of people do – and it turns out that I have unwittingly been a participant contributing content to a sharing business (i.e. ).  These disruptive business models are now global, and spawning offspring of all kinds.  Tom Slee tackles the phenomenon and exposes it for what it is.In the preface, which updates d [...]

Slee has written a well researched book. This author details the nature of the "sharing" economy such as UBER and Air BNB, pointing out quite clearly this "sharing" is nothing more than transferring the liabilities, risks and corporate obligations on to the working poor and local communities. Slee describes the new economy where companies that are organizing people "share" resources such as accommodation or transportation. In other words they exploit ruthlessly property that does not belong to t [...]

For Those Who Believe the Sharing Economy Merits Further ScrutinyI have to admit that my dislike of Uber came initially from the “God” feature in their platform and how it was used to stalk a female reporter. Beyond that, as the author documents in this book. Many of sharing economy companies trade on their utopian flavored marketing while still being veritable old school corporations. Well worth the read.

Technologist Tom Slee argues that the so-called sharing economy damages development, extends harsh free-market practices into previously protected areas of our lives, and presents the opportunity for a few people to make fortunes by damaging communities and pushing vulnerable individuals to take on unsustainable risk.Reviewed on The BookBlast® Diary 2017

I’ll preface this with the caveat that I have a personal connection with the transportation industry—my husband has driven a licensed cab for 35 years or so. However, while I do see Uber and Lyft as a threat to our way of earning a living, my understanding of how the taxi industry works is what made the gaping holes in the “sharing economy” clear when I first came in contact with it. I will also note that, in presenting the alternate side of the discussion on several websites where the u [...]

Brilliant counter point to the constant narrative that is fed by mainstream and tech media and Ayn Rand fans about sharing economy that it is disrupting the old ways of doing businesses which the author points out is a facade and underneath it all, they are just conventional for profit businesses (no sharing) mainly to serve the well off recommended

Excellent tonic against the sharing economy hype, and a peek at parts of the business model that don't square so well with the warm and fuzzy marketing rhetoric. For the most part, very well argued, supported with good footnotes and data, and delivered in an even-handed manner. The best chapter in my opinion is the one covering "self-regulation" through rating systems, where he absolutely destroys common claims and shows how such systems function to keep service providers in line. As many others [...]

This book delves into the undercurrent of the Sharing Economy. It looks at the downsides of Uber, AirBnB, and other companies and initiatives that seek to upend existing industries. On the surface, they present themselves as the alternative to the oppressive industries they seek to replace, with environmental, social and community benefits. These are laudable goals. However, as the author shows with many of these types of ventures, they start small, but when they scale and when money gets involv [...]

I've always been suspicious of the term "sharing economy". If it is really about sharing then why does it seem to be making the haves richer (those who own flats they don't live in or stuff they don't use) and the have-a-lots (the VC firms who own the companies) very rich indeed. Slee provides argument and evidence to go with my hunch. The book wanders a bit towards the end (the chapter on the commons doesn't seem as tightly argued or well researched as the earlier chapters) and at times could b [...]

Tom Slee takes a close and well documented look at the so-called Sharing Economy. He shows how the initial sharing idea has been subverted by a hard core Silicon Valley venture capital winner-take-it-all strategy. In the case of its most prominent companies, Airbnb and Uber, over 1 bn investments dictate the rules of the new came; externalizations of risks while focusing on world dominance. At its wake are the workers and the city areas that developed their character as commons. It is an importa [...]

Tom Slee provides a very different perspective of the sharing economy that everyone else praising. I really appreciate that he critically compare the story of sharing economy companies with that of Animal Farm. I don't agree with his critics about Linux systems though. He is concerned that the support from for-profit organizations would distort the original goal of Linux. However, to me, there are so many different distributions of Linux OS that you can choose. By and large, Linux is still a ope [...]

This book made me think about the drawbacks of the sharing economy. Some interesting pointsSeparation of risk(spread between customers and service providers) from reward(to platform)Privileged consumption-lifestyle as a serviceIntimacy scaled up is no longer intimacy(reputation as a service-Tinder Premium/ reviews)Profiting from emergencies is price gouing as that demand a community responseWeb 2.0 digital commons are tended by a community but owned by a single entity-often these are built up on [...]

Una revisión crítica de la llamada "economía colaborativa". Aunque la mayor parte de los argumentos no son demasiado originales, es interesante contar con un resumen de las objeciones sobre las actividades de las empresas de este sector. La parte más interesante es la disección del discurso sobre la comunidad en el caso de AirBNB, que enfatiza la libertad de alquilar por parte de los anfitriones, pero soslaya las consecuencias negativas -menor disponibilidad de alquileres para locales, más [...]

This book is great! My only complaint is that very often the designer would kern out some paragraphs for better line length and it was SO ANNOYING to read, specially because of the huge difference between the kerned out paragraphs and the regular ones. No concern with comfortable reading.

Very eloquently argues a lot of vague thoughts I'd had about the 'Sharing Economy' - basically that it's a backdoor method of deregulation on a massive scale. Reading this and Rise of the Robots back to back was probably not the best idea in terms of keeping positivity high for the future of work.

Phenomenally well-researched, both in terms of original research and surveys of existing work, extremely well-argued, and written in a clear, engaging voice.An absolute must for anyone interested in the Sharing Economy.

Much needed counter-narrative to that prevailing in the Bay Area. Doesn't mean I agree with all of it, but does a good job of laying out the case against the misnamed "Sharing" economy.

I discussed Slee's excellent book in this piece: counterpunch/2016/02/1

Excellent and thorough reality check on a current trend in "innovation." A great book to recommend to your tech enthusiast friends.

It could be longer. It could go further beyong Uber and Airbnb. Nevertheless it's a valuable book.

Interesting but heavily flawed arguments.


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    Posted by:Tom Slee
    Published :2018-08-27T20:08:42+00:00