Unexpected News: Reading the Bible With Third World Eyes

In Unexpected News, Robert McAfee Brown looks at ten biblical texts through a new lens Brown s analysis is concerned with how our reading of the Bible is dependent on our experiences and worldview Brown sets out to understand how third world Christians, that is, Christians who live in poverty and powerlessness, interpret the Bible Brown argues that by reading the BiblIn Unexpected News, Robert McAfee Brown looks at ten biblical texts through a new lens Brown s analysis is concerned with how our reading of the Bible is dependent on our experiences and worldview Brown sets out to understand how third world Christians, that is, Christians who live in poverty and powerlessness, interpret the Bible Brown argues that by reading the Bible in new ways, we can learn about other cultures as well as gain a new understanding of the biblical message.
Unexpected News Reading the Bible With Third World Eyes In Unexpected News Robert McAfee Brown looks at ten biblical texts through a new lens Brown s analysis is concerned with how our reading of the Bible is dependent on our experiences and worldview Bro

  • Title: Unexpected News: Reading the Bible With Third World Eyes
  • Author: Robert McAfee Brown
  • ISBN: 9780664245528
  • Page: 183
  • Format: Paperback
    • Best Download [Robert McAfee Brown] ✓ Unexpected News: Reading the Bible With Third World Eyes || [History Book] PDF ✓
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      Posted by:Robert McAfee Brown
      Published :2018-05-11T12:41:05+00:00

    About the Author

    Robert McAfee Brown

    Robert McAfee Brown was a minister in the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, a theologian, and an activist He earned a bachelor s degree from Amherst College in 1943 and was ordained a Presbyterian minister in 1944 Brown earned a Bachelor of Divinity degree from Union Theological Seminary in 1945, and served as a United States Navy chaplain from 1945 to 1946 The recipient of a Fulbright grant, Brown studied at the University of Oxford before completing a doctorate in the philosophy of religion at Columbia University in 1951 He married Sydney Thomson, and had four children.Initially, Brown taught at his alma mater, Union Theological Seminary, before accepting an appointment as Professor of Religion at Stanford University in 1962 There he became an international leader in civil rights, ecumenical and social justice causes Brown campaigned against U.S involvement in the Vietnam War and was a co founder of the group Clergy and Laity Concerned about Vietnam He was also a Protestant observer at the Second Vatican Council.Brown left Stanford in 1975 to return to Union as Professor of World Christianity and Ecumenism, but quickly found his new post unfulfilling He resigned and moved back to the Bay Area, where he taught at the Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley until his retirement in 1984 Brown was the author of 29 books, and his papers are now held at the Graduate Theological Union Brown died on 4 September 2001, survived by his wife A lecture series is named in his honor.

    440 Comment

    • Joseph said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      The title of the epilogue appropriately reads, "For those who feel personally assaulted"--speaking to western Christians that will probably feel "resentful and angry" after being attacked "from a different direction in every chapter." I resonate with the title, but also think that this book needs to be read by those of us in the American church to challenge us to be accountable for our actions, live justly, and love God.

    • Glen Gersmehl said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      an exceptional intro to the biblical basis of the liberation theology movement and its profound insights and broad usefulness

    • Courtney Beck said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      A really good one - helps you to understand God's heart for the poor.

    • Aubrey said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      Liberation themes echo throughout the Bible. Believers are called to challenge material oppression, side with the ‘least’ among us, and work to empower the downtrodden. Christianity is inherently a matter of politics, economics, and power.Through an iterative process of worship and action, Christians live this practice. Our natural tendency is to hang out at the feel-good pinnacle & build tabernacles (Luke 9:33), but God calls us to come down from the mountaintop & love through actio [...]

    • Michael said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      In this book, the author takes ten well known stories from the Bible and asks his readers (who are, generally speaking, white, affluent, educated Americans) to imagine how a person in the third world might hear them. It is a remarkable exercise, to say the least. The more I read and learn about religion in general, and Christianity in particular, the more I come to realize how far from the actual message of Jesus Americans (and Westerners) have wandered. I read today that in the year 1900 there [...]

    • 7jane said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      After reading this I hesitated a little, not being quite sure whether to put it in the "religion" or "politics" category, but this is ultimately about religion, and how religion cannot be separate and neutral about politics, no matter what time we live in.This book is about how third world countries interpret certain Bible texts (though continent-wise this one concentrates on Latin America the most). Its politics-examples and such show clearly when it was written, but just a few changes of names [...]

    • Daniel said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      The title to this book set it up to fail. I was very excited by the idea of looking through scripture with Third World Eyes, but it came up short. But I still think the ideas of the book and the author's general point are worth chewing on. Unexpected News posits that we, in the west, have developed a skewed reading of scripture, that our individualistic culture misses major themes that our brothers and sisters in the Third World can enlighten for us. This I agree whole-heartedly with and was hap [...]

    • Liz said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      Unexpected News is ok. It's prophetically bent and largely a criticism on the Western world (read: America)'s myopic reading and interpretation of Scripture. It relies heavily on Gutierrez' liberation theology. This used to be in the curriculum for the urban ministry internship I staff, but we've since found it a little outdated (its major examples are the Cold War - totally fair, given it was published in 1984!).What is still relevant is that it alludes to the US involvement in a number of Sout [...]

    • Dee said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      A great book written in the early 1980's. Some of the info is dated of course because the author is talking current events of the time. I don't remember where I got this book, but I've had it a long time, 'meaning to read it'. Brown gives a good analysis of what the times were like when Jesus and the apostles experienced the things later written about. He looks at how the Jewish/Christian people of the first century A.D. were living: poor, oppressed. Many people of Central and South America in t [...]

    • Gracie said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      Reading "Unexpected News" took me longer than normal. I could only read a little at a time. It's like walking on pieces of glass. Very convicting! But I'm glad I read it through to the end. Chapter 9 especially, "Jesus' Vision: A Task For The Nations". In Matthew 25, we learn that we are not only personally responsible to the poor, hungry, thirsty, immigrant, imprisoned, etc we are also responsible as a NATION! I'm going to make sure our President is made aware of this book. He is already workin [...]

    • David Elkins said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      Though this book is very dated in its application, the value of Brown's writing is how he uses prophetic imagination to apply the scripture to the issues and injustices of our modern world. I found his creative applications of scripture engaging, though at times he tone becomes a bit monotonous with his exclusive liberation theology perspective.

    • Jessica said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      This book is hard to read (and I don't mean that the words are big or whatnot). I don't recommend it for everyone. I do recommend it for the Christian who has read Noam Chomsky, though. It's a book that makes you think, and that doesn't have any easy solutions tied up in a bow.

    • Ian said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      A little dated with a lot of Cold War analogies about power and the developming world but good interpretations of scripture. Draws from Gospel in Solentiname, which I will be putting on my to-read list.

    • Rachel said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      I enjoyed this but found it made the same point in almost every chapter. It would be a good study for some church groups to do, and I think it would ease a lot of people into liberation theology.

    • Mrs.soule said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      I can't think of a single person I don't want to read this book - it should be mandatory Christian reading.

    • Steve Love said:
      Aug 21, 2018 - 12:41 PM

      What an eye-opener. I still don't quite know how to respond to this book in my own life.

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