97 Orchard Street, New York: Stories of Immigrant Life

Linda Granfield Arlene Alda


97 Orchard Street, New York: Stories of Immigrant Life

97 Orchard Street, New York: Stories of Immigrant Life

  • Title: 97 Orchard Street, New York: Stories of Immigrant Life
  • Author: Linda Granfield Arlene Alda
  • ISBN: 9780887765803
  • Page: 404
  • Format: Paperback



Imagine growing up on Orchard Street in 1916 If you were a member of the large Confino family you d be living in 325 square feet of space The only fresh air and natural light would come from the two windows in the front room No heat, no water, no bathtub, no shower Toilet in the hall.The Confinos apartment is only one part of the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, an exImagine growing up on Orchard Street in 1916 If you were a member of the large Confino family you d be living in 325 square feet of space The only fresh air and natural light would come from the two windows in the front room No heat, no water, no bathtub, no shower Toilet in the hall.The Confinos apartment is only one part of the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, an extraordinary facility in New York City The Museum has restored 97 Orchard Street to provide us with an opportunity to understand the immigrant experience shared by millions who have come to North America.In text and with archival photos, Linda Granfield tells the story of four families, including the Confinos, who called 97 Orchard Street home, and provides information about the period, the history of the house, and the neighborhood, bringing to life conditions that were familiar to immigrants in many of North America s big cities The stories and archival materials are beautifully complemented by Arlene Alda s sensitive photographs that evoke the hardship, the dignity, and the hope encompassed in 97 Orchard Street.The book includes useful facts, information about the Museum and its efforts to help new immigrants who share similar experiences Whether or not the reader can visit the Museum itself, this book is a valuable resource in understanding our own histories in North America.


Recent Comments "97 Orchard Street, New York: Stories of Immigrant Life"

A great overview of the fantastic story of a tenenent that has been restored as a museum on the Lower East Side. The book holds stories interspersed with pictures and photos of artifacts of the people who lived here. I really enjoyed reading the stories of some families I didn't hear about on my tour!

Between 1863 and 1935, the tenement building at 97 Orchard Street in New York City was home to some 7000 families, mostly new Americans from many parts of the world. The building has been restored to late nineteenth century condition by the Tenement Museum, an initiative spearheaded in the 1980s by historian and social activist Ruth Abram and co-founder Anita Jacobson.This book, in photographs and narrative, tells the story of several immigrant families in the squalid apartments here. The book i [...]

This slim volume (55 pages) is an introduction to the Tenement Museum in New York City. I picked it up in the museum shop after my first tour there (I did the "Sweatshop Workers" tour).It profiles a few families from among the 7000 residents who lived in the 20 apartments between 1863 and 1935. It also provides some contextual essays (immigration in general, Ellis Island, the construction of 97 Orchard St, etc.). It is filled with evocative photographs, some of which I saw during my tour and oth [...]

97 Orchard Street is the building in which the Tenement Museum is located on the lower east side of Manhattan. If you haven't been there, stop reading and go there. It has four apartments that have been 'renovated' to a specific family who lived there. An Irish family in the 1860s, a German family in the 1880s, a Jewish family at the turn of the century, and an Italian family in the 1930s. By learning about each family, you learn about their journey and the times in the city. This book is focuse [...]

This book is like having a homemade, yummy, warm meal. I highly recommend it. Granfield takes you on a culinary tour of Lower East Side New York tenement life between 1850 and 1930. She paints a picture of crowded markets with pushcarts, neighborhood delis and family dinners. There is a detailed description of what foods immigrants brought from Germany, Ireland, Italy, and Eastern Europe. One gets an idea of what it must have been like to travel in steerage for a month, with little more to eat b [...]

If you like history and you like cooking, you're probably going to like the book. The story basically documents the lives of four immigrant families living in a New York slum at the turn of the century. The author describes how each family (each a different ethnicity) adapts to their new culinary environment, and in turn how the environment responds to the influx of new ethnic cuisines. Obviously being historical fiction, the author has to extrapolate a bit, but she gives a good vision of how ea [...]

I read this book years ago, but it has stuck with me. I was prompted towards it because of a visit to the Lower East Tenement Museum, and I found the book a solid companion to the experience of the museum. In short, I was compelled to read it like I'm rarely compelled to read non-fiction. I learned an incredible amount and constantly annoyed my friends with fun facts about the origins of the school lunch program and other facets of life in turn of the century NYC. It's well-written, informative, [...]

Loved this very short (55 pages) book. It was produced in conjunction with the Lower East Side Tenement Museum. The book gives brief descriptions of several of the families who occupied the tenement at 97 Orchard at various times in the past. We are invited into the tiny apartments of the families. Photographs show us how the rooms looked when the families lived there. This particular tenement was inhabited by over 7,000 people between 1863 and 1935. It has now been restored as a museum. My only [...]

This is basically a picture book, which I didn't realize when I requested it from the library. I put it on hold because I had just read the 97 Orchard Street book on food. Still, it was an interesting follow-up and complemented the other book. I'd love to go visit the Tenement Museum now, especially since my grandparents immigrated here from southern Italy and many of the experiences in these two books were theirs.

I was expecting more of a storyline for each of the different families rather than each family being a springboard to discuss the larger community. Once I let go of that and quit trying to read it like a linear story, it was easier to read and I learned something new. At the end of the day, that's not a bad thing. Enjoyed the parts about Ellis Island the most. Read it as part of a book club and we all brought heritage dishes to the meet up. That was fantastic!

This is more a brief pictorial history with a glimpse into a few immigrant family's history who lived in the first tenement building in NYC. The photography tells it's own story most elegantly.I was glad to learn more about this era of USA history and surprised to learn about 97 Orchard Street Tenement Museum. I hope to visit it someday.

I really enjoyed visiting the Lower East Side Tenement Museum a few years ago. This book helps tell the story and would be great for kids to read to get a better understanding of what folks went through to improve their lives. Leave their homeland, come to a country they only heard about, find housing, find work, learn the language and live among many and survive.

Fascinating book! It’s amazing to see how our food traditions provide constancy in our lives—and shape the ways our communities work. If you like history and/or food, you will love this book.Request this book

Pleasant and interesting tale based on immigrant families from different cultures all of whom live at this address. The author tells mostly of the culinary richness and adaptability of the people who lived there and it is a good cultural reference that gives a lively picture of life on NY's lower east side at the turn of the 20th century

This is the biography of five immigrant families living at 97 Orchard Street. The author tells the story of their lives through their food. It's an interesting twist if you are interested in ethnic food and recipes from the 'old country.'

Fascinating history of NYC. Remnants of those early immigrant lives still exist in the NYC area and certainly within families descended from them. Understanding some of these lives helps explain many of the traditions and views still present.

Because I had recently visited the Tenement Museum which is 97 Orchard Street, I really enjoyed learning more about the families who had lived there and the foods traditions they had brought with them to this country.

Very enjoyable and highly readable, and also a learning experience about immigrant life. Who knew that geese played such a role in immigrant cookery? I thought of them as the ultimate WASP-y Christmas dinner.

Excellent overview of immigrant life and life in the tenements in NY City's Lower East Side. It's by the Tenement Museum, which is a fantastic place to visit if you are ever there. Mostly covers what is in their tours.

Really enjoyed this book. Lots of good information about immigration in the early 20th century. Enjoyed the idea of using food and culture as windows into the immigrant experience.

Read this as part of my visit to the NYC Tenement Museum. I found this to be a great accompaniment and the trip helped bring the book even more to life.

A quick read, lots of photographs, for youth. Great preparation for a visit to the Tenement Museum in New York, and a description of much that was experienced by my immigrant ancestors.

Being sick made me read this much faster. As history, it has methodological issues. As narrative, it was really intriguing and definitely worth the read.

Interesting to read about food trends and how they evolved over time in America. Also curious to see how some ideas about food preferences in my own experience were related to this history.

LOVED it!

Introductory look at the tenements on Orchard St, companion to the tours they offer in nyc.

A good short introduction to the Lower East Side Tenement Museum for kids told primarily through photographs, both current & period.

A small book with great photos from the Lower East Side Tenement Museum. A brief look at some of the families who lived at 97 Orchard Street when they first came to the States.

Quick read - interesting

Inspired by Ars Nova - found myself wanting to try some of the recipes.


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    Posted by:Linda Granfield Arlene Alda
    Published :2018-08-15T15:03:44+00:00