The Cooper's Wife Is Missing: The Trials Of Bridget Cleary

In 1895 twenty six year old Bridget Cleary disappeared from her cottage in rural County Tipperary and remained missing for several days At last her body was discovered, bent, broken, and badly burned in a shallow grave Within a few days, her unimaginable story came to light for almost a week before her death she had been confined, starved, threatened, physically and verIn 1895 twenty six year old Bridget Cleary disappeared from her cottage in rural County Tipperary and remained missing for several days At last her body was discovered, bent, broken, and badly burned in a shallow grave Within a few days, her unimaginable story came to light for almost a week before her death she had been confined, starved, threatened, physically and verbally abused, exorcised, and finally burned to death by her husband, father, aunt, cousins, and neighbors, who had collectively confused a simple flu with possession by the fairies In The Cooper s Wife Is Missing, Joan Hoff and Marian Yeates try to make sense of this outlandish, unfathomable, medieval trial and murder Drawing on firsthand accounts, contemporary newspaper reports, police records, trial testimony, and a rich wealth of folklore, they weave a mesmerizing fireside tale of magic, madness, and mystery This is narrative history at its evocative best.
The Cooper s Wife Is Missing The Trials Of Bridget Cleary In twenty six year old Bridget Cleary disappeared from her cottage in rural County Tipperary and remained missing for several days At last her body was discovered bent broken and badly burned

  • Title: The Cooper's Wife Is Missing: The Trials Of Bridget Cleary
  • Author: Joan Hoff Marian Yeates Marian Yates
  • ISBN: 9780465030880
  • Page: 283
  • Format: Paperback
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      Posted by:Joan Hoff Marian Yeates Marian Yates
      Published :2018-04-06T19:24:08+00:00

    About the Author

    Joan Hoff Marian Yeates Marian Yates

    Joan Hoff Marian Yeates Marian Yates Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Cooper's Wife Is Missing: The Trials Of Bridget Cleary book, this is one of the most wanted Joan Hoff Marian Yeates Marian Yates author readers around the world.

    117 Comment

    • Chris said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      I first heard about Bridget Cleary when I read At the Bottom of the Garden: A Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins, Nymphs, and Other Troublesome Things. A few weeks later, I saw a copy of The Burning of Bridget Cleary: A True Story. If you haven't read that book, don't read this one.Bridget Cleary was burned to death by her husband and other families, supposedly, because her husband believed she was a fairy changeling. The trial was a sensational one. Joan Hoff and Marion Yeates raise an interst [...]

    • David said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      I have combined my review of this book with that of "The Burning of Bridget Cleary" by Angela Bourke - it's here: /review/show/Bottom line: skip this one, which is a bloated mess, and read Angela Bourke's book instead.

    • Steph (loves water) said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      When I picked this book up, I thought it was going to be a story of yet another poor woman burned for practicing "witchcraft" in Ireland. I found it to be so much more than thata well-written, well researched book about the ancient culture practiced pre-Celt settlement, the developement of the Catholic Church in Ireland and subsequent colonization by England. Professor Hoff shows us the roots of what became the IRA in the twentieth century and how a murder and trial of a woman based upon superst [...]

    • Heather G said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      If you are interested in Irish History this is at times a very interesting book. If you are reading it just for Bridget Cleary it is a very dry and monotonous book. Plus the part about the hounds was completely pointless.

    • James said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      For me, one thing held this book back from being great, and that was the long winded history that the author uses to relate the story. While much of the history and information is very interesting and extremely relevant, the focus of the event, which is the alleged fairie possession of Bridget Cleary in the early 1900s and the brutally botched exorcism her husband and family attempt to perform on her, is lost in much of the tedious setting details within the story. There is plenty of great histo [...]

    • Barbara said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      In 1895, an Irish woman, Bridget Cleary, was believed by her family and neighbors to be possessed by fairies. They tried for 9 days to purge the fairies from her body, and finally burned her body in an effort to rid her of the bad spirits. For this they were tried and convicted. Interwoven with the story of Bridget Cleary are long well-researched passages explaining the political, socioeconomic and religious conflicts of Ireland -- bringing together details about Ireland's wishes for political a [...]

    • Wendy said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      A fascinating but slightly uneven read.The author draws links between the publicity around the trial and it's relation with contemporary events around Irish Nationalism and Home Rule. Which I suppose are valid, but the rather dry political history probably intended to provide context really doesn't gel with the way the story of the fairy trial and ordeal that took place in that cottage over those nine days was written. It's kind of like two books were sort of smooshed together.It's still a fasci [...]

    • Linda said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      Poor Bridget Cleary, killed for her belief in fairies. Bridget's husband believed that she became a changeling, her body inhabited by an evil fairy spirit while her own was taken to live in the other world. As a result, her husband, with some friends and relatives, attempted to drive out the evil spirit, and in doing so, burned Bridget to death. The narrative in this history is chilling in its detail. Interspersed with this incredible account are more prosaic chapters covering the history of Ire [...]

    • Siobhan said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      The book is half history of the Irish Home Rule struggle and half the story of the murder of Bridget Cleary in 1895, who was believed by her husband to be a changling, after being taken by the fairies. I have to admit ti skimming through some of the longer political discussions, but overall the struggle for autonomy was an interesting history and the story of Bridget was fascinating as perhaps the last witch burning in the modern world.

    • Kathleen McRae said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      An interesting story with much history of Irish fight for nationhood or even self rule. The conditions of Irish peasantry was a sad existance and the people were essentially christian but many people still had belief in the old pagan rites and very little knowledge of why things happened. These happenings were often attributed to superstitions and this story shows that plus the complicity of the church and the english overlords in keeping the people ignorant and unlearned

    • Fishface said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      Much more detailed (and grisly) than THE BURNING OF BRIDGET CLEARY, but also takes the reader through some unbelievably looooooooong detours through Irish political history that -- as near as I can tell -- have no bearing at all on the story. The detours into Irish folklore have much more bearing, but are treated almost as interesting footnotes rather than as factors that led directly to Bridgie's horrible, horrible death.

    • Jaime said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      I don't remember what made me buy this book, but it sat on my shelf for about a year before I read it. Bridget Cleary is suspected of fraternizing with faries in Ireland about 100 years ago. To determine whether she is enchanted, Bridget is subjected to a series of tests and trials, which eventually lead to her death. The description of the courtroom proceedings is fascinating, as the laws of the government are pitted against long-held beliefs and folklore of the countryside.

    • Suzie Diver said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      Reads like 2 different books - the story of Bridget Cleary is one and the other is the political history of Ireland in 1895. I read the whole book expecting the authors to bring those two pieces together and it never happened. Disappointing.

    • Kate said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      This book seemed to try to branch out into too many issues. The trial was really interesting, but the story of the politics and church around it became too involved and took away from the central story. Almost crammed two books into what should have been one.

    • Connie Scott said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      This is a very well researched tragedy that highlights the times and beliefs of the people. There is so much pain, confusion and clashing of new and old ideas and beliefs. Poverty and the plight of the soul.

    • Liz said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      Not sure about this one--the background history is slow going.

    • Vicki said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      Very interesting bit of history. A bit slow at parts, but I enjoyed it.

    • ღ Carol jinx~☆~ said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      A rich wealth of folklore, woven into a mesmerizing fireside tale of magic, madness, and mystery. This is narrative history at its best.

    • Caroline Bernero said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:24 PM

      This book was a tough read. The depth of historical fact was too much. I found it read like a textbook at times. The trial was interesting but it took me a while to finish.

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