Madame Bovary

In partnership with the New York Public Library, Doubleday is proud to introduce a very special collector s series of literary masterpieces Lavishly illustrated with rare archival material from the library s extensive resources, including the renowned Berg collection, these editions will bring the classics to life for a new generation of readers In addition to original aIn partnership with the New York Public Library, Doubleday is proud to introduce a very special collector s series of literary masterpieces Lavishly illustrated with rare archival material from the library s extensive resources, including the renowned Berg collection, these editions will bring the classics to life for a new generation of readers In addition to original artwork, each volume contains a fascinating selection of unique materials such as handwritten diaries, letters, manuscripts, and notebooks Simply put, this series presents the work of our most beloved authors in what may well be their most beautiful editions, perfect to own or to give Published on the occasion of Doubleday s 100th birthday, the New York Public Library Collector s Editions are sure to become an essential part of the modern book lover s private library.Our edition of Jane Eyre features illustrations by Ethel Gabain from a 1923 Paris limited edition and an eclectic selection of archival materials including a handwritten letter from the author to her publisher This volume is a unique celebration of Charlotte Bronte s most famous novel.
Madame Bovary In partnership with the New York Public Library Doubleday is proud to introduce a very special collector s series of literary masterpieces Lavishly illustrated with rare archival material from the li

  • Title: Madame Bovary
  • Author: Gustave Flaubert Geoffrey Wall
  • ISBN: 9780140445268
  • Page: 462
  • Format: Paperback
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    About the Author

    Gustave Flaubert Geoffrey Wall

    Gustave Flaubert December 12, 1821 May 8, 1880 is counted among the greatest Western novelists He was born in Rouen, Seine Maritime, in the Haute Normandie Region of France.Flaubert s curious modes of composition favored and were emphasized by these peculiarities He worked in sullen solitude, sometimes occupying a week in the completion of one page, never satisfied with what he had composed, violently tormenting his brain for the best turn of a phrase, the most absolutely final adjective It cannot be said that his incessant labors were not rewarded His private letters show that he was not one of those to whom easy and correct language is naturally given he gained his extraordinary perfection with the unceasing sweat of his brow One of the most severe of academic critics admits that in all his works, and in every page of his works, Flaubert may be considered a model of style.That he was one of the greatest writers who ever lived in France is now commonly admitted, and his greatness principally depends upon the extraordinary vigour and exactitude of his style Less perhaps than any other writer, not of France, but of modern Europe, Flaubert yields admission to the inexact, the abstract, the vaguely inapt expression which is the bane of ordinary methods of composition He never allowed a clich to pass him, never indulgently or wearily went on, leaving behind him a phrase which almost expressed his meaning Being, as he is, a mixture in almost equal parts of the romanticist and the realist, the marvellous propriety of his style has been helpful to later writers of both schools, of every school The absolute exactitude with which he adapts his expression to his purpose is seen in all parts of his work, but particularly in the portraits he draws of the figures in his principal romances The degree and manner in which, since his death, the fame of Flaubert has extended, form an interesting chapter of literary history.The publication of Madame Bovary in 1857 had been followed by scandal than admiration it was not understood at first that this novel was the beginning of something new, the scrupulously truthful portraiture of life Gradually this aspect of his genius was accepted, and began to crowd out all others At the time of his death he was famous as a realist, pure and simple Under this aspect Flaubert exercised an extraordinary influence over mile de Goncourt, Alphonse Daudet and Zola But even after the decline of the realistic school Flaubert did not lose prestige other facets of his genius caught the light It has been perceived that he was not merely realistic, but real that his clairvoyance was almost boundless that he saw certain phenomena clearly than the best of observers had done Flaubert is a writer who must always appeal to other authors than to the world at large, because the art of writing, the indefatigable pursuit of perfect expression, were always before him, and because he hated the lax felicities of improvisation as a disloyalty to the most sacred procedures of the literary artist.He can be said to have made cynicism into an art form, as evinced by this observation from 1846 To be stupid, and selfish, and to have good health are the three requirements for happiness though if stupidity is lacking, the others are useless His Oeuvres Compl tes 8 vols 1885 were printed from the original manuscripts, and included, besides the works mentioned already, the two plays, Le Candidat and Le Ch teau des avurs Another edition 10 vols appeared in 1873 1885 Flaubert s correspondence with George Sand was published in 1884 with an introduction by Guy de Maupassant.He has been admired or written about by almost every major literary personality of the 20th century, including philosophers such as Pierre Bourdieu Georges Perec named Sentimental Education as one of his favou

    777 Comment

    • Kelly said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      Oh, Emma. Emma, Emma, Emma. Darling, why must you make it so easy ? No, dear, (for once) I don’t mean for the men. I mean for everyone else in the world who goes into this book just looking for an excuse to make fun of you. I would say that most people don’t know that much about France, but they do know a few things: that they like their baguettes, their socialism, Sartre, dirrrty dirrty sexy lurrrve and they despise this thing called the bourgeoisie. This book doesn’t really do a thing to [...]

    • DeLaina said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      This is one of the books that has had a profound effect on my life. The moral? Be happy with what you have and where you are!!! Mme. Bovary fritters away her entire life with thoughts of, "If only X would happen, THEN I could be truly happy" and yet she never is. She gets everything she thinks she wants only to find out she's still not content.I read this while I was engaged and at the time, thought, "Well, I'll be happier when I'm married, but once I am, then life will be fabulous". After a few [...]

    • Jeanette"Astute Crabbist" said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      Oy, the tedium, the drudgery of trying to read this book! I tried to get into this story. Really, I did. It's a classic, right? And everyone else likes it. I kept making myself continue, hoping I could get into the story and figure out what's supposed to be so good about it.I won't waste any more of my precious reading time on this. It's about a self-absorbed young wife who longs for anyone else's life except her own. When she's in the city, she dreams of the farm. When she's in the country, she [...]

    • Issa Deerbany said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      الرواية تنتمي الى المدرسةً الواقعية والتي بدأت في الظهور في بداية القرن التاسع عشر.مدام بوفاري التي اصابت نفسها وعائلتها بالخراب بسبب نفسها الشهوانية والتي ام تستطع السيطرة على نفسها والحفاظ على شرف زوجها رغم الحب الذي يكنه لها ومركزه المرموق في المجتمع الريفي كطبيب رغم عد [...]

    • Petra X said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      Three and a half stars, uprated to 5 stars because I can't get it out of my head. 9 April 2012.Not sure what to make of it. The self-obsessed Emma Bovary was obviously (to me) a side of Flaubert himself. She feels that there is so much more but her limited life fences her in and instead of drawing into herself, seeing what she has to offer, how to make the best of herself, she wants happiness to come to her just as it does in the romance novels she, and Flaubert, read.I understood that spiritual [...]

    • Helen Ροζουλί Εωσφόρος Vernus Portitor Arcanus Ταμετούρο Αμούν Arnum said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      GUSTAVE FLAUBERT : «Η Μαντάμ Μποβαρύ είμαι εγώ»Υπάρχει κάτι το γοητευτικά παράξενο και αξιοσημείωτο σε αυτό το βιβλίο. Θεωρώ πως η Έμμα Μποβαρύ,η ηρωίδα με τα μοιραία πάθη και τους πόνους απο τα λάθη,είναι ένας χαρακτήρας λογοτεχνικά αξέχαστος,διαχρονικά μισητός και θλιβερά αγαπη [...]

    • Lizzy said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      Before marriage she thought herself in love; but the happiness that should have followed this love not having come, she must, she thought, have been mistaken. And Emma tried to find out what one meant exactly in life by the words felicity, passion, rapture, that had seemed to her so beautiful in books.You might be surprised to learn that I was mesmerized by Emma’s life story. I was mesmerized and suffered along with her as she capsized further and further into the ambushes life presented her. [...]

    • Lisa said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      Since I read Quicksand by Nella Larsen this week, Emma Bovary started haunting my mind yet again!We are old friends, Emma and I. I spent hours and hours over a dictionary at age seventeen in high school, trying to read about her agonies in original French, with only the Isabelle Huppert film as a guidance. In fact, I actually think I owe it to Emma Bovary that I finally made it over the threshold to understand written French. That ultimately led me to university studies in French literature, and [...]

    • Kat Kennedy said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      Henry James once said, "Madame Bovary has a perfection that not only stamps it, but that makes it stand almost alone; it holds itself with such a supreme unapproachable assurance as both excites and defies judgment."That's right. Defies judgment.I don't know he looks kind of judgy to meUnfortunately, I had to read a translation as my French is nowhere near good enough to read the original. Though I am assured that the prose in the original French are amazing and inspiring.I can certainly appreci [...]

    • Orsodimondo said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      C'EST MOI Meravigliosa come sempre, semplicemente perfetta, Isabelle Huppert nell’adattamento del 1991 firmato da Claude Chabrol.Letto un paio di volte e sempre amato. Uno dei massimi capolavori della letteratura, secondo me.Flaubert è uno dei sommi: me lo immagino di notte, solo nella sua casa di Rouen, che sono ovviamente stato a visitare, al lume di candela, che 'recita' le parole scritte, ancora e ancora, urlandole, cancellando, limando, riscrivendo, fino a trovare la formula giusta, quel [...]

    • Michael Finocchiaro said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      My 3rd reading of this masterpiece written with irony and finesse. The eternal story of Emma Bovary and her broken dreams is heartbreaking every time.The narration is actually quite modern in that the perspective changes quite often from a mysterious first person in the beginning (a schoolmate of Charles Bovary?) to the interior monologues of Charles, Emma, Léon, and Rodolphe. The descriptions of the various locations in the book are always surprising with tiny references to the principle chara [...]

    • Martine said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      Like every European teenager who takes French at secondary school, I was supposed to read Madame Bovary when I was seventeen or so. I chose not to, and boy, am I glad I did. I couldn't possibly have done justice to the richness of Flaubert's writing as a seventeen-year-old. Moreover, I probably would have hated the characters so much that I never would have given the book another chance. Which would have been a shame, as it's really quite deserving of the tremendous reputation it has.Madame Bova [...]

    • Nayra.Hassan said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      مائة جلده و مائة دينار ذهبي هذا هو تقييمي بضمير مستريح لجوستاف فلوبير ومدام "زلطة " الشهيرة ببوفاريالدنانير مكافاة على حذقه ومهارته في رسم لوحات ادبية لا تصدقو الجلدات او الضربات لانه يصرف ذكاؤه فيما لايفيدلو كان فلوبير يحيا بيننا اليوم لكان طبيبا نفسيا بارعا يتم الحجز عنده [...]

    • Fionnuala said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      There’s something about Flaubert’s writing that makes me want to comment on his books as I’m reading them. I had that experience with Bouvard et Pécuchet last year and I had it again while reading this book, so I jotted down my thoughts as I read.Part I jottings When you’re reading such a famous story as this one, the ending of which everyone knows already, you read it differently. You dawdle along, indulging yourself with odd details. And so, in these early pages, I’m admiring how Fl [...]

    • Agir(آگِر) said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      گوستاو فلوبر نزديك چهار سال براي نوشتن اين داستان وقت صرف كرد.وي سبكي كاملا جديد پديد آورد؛ اينكه راوي داستان فقط ناظري باشد دقيق براي نمايش زندگي و نظر شخصي اش در داستان دیده نشودبه قول خودش: هنرمند باید شبیه پروردگارِ خالق باشد، نادیده و برهمه چیز توانا؛ ذاتی که در همه جا حس [...]

    • Foad said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      کتاب سوزیمن یک وقتی توی گوگل پلاس، مجموعه پست هایی میذاشتم با تگ #کتاب_سوزی، و هر چی از نویسنده ها و فلاسفه در نفی کتابخوانی پیدا می کردم ذیل این تگ منتشر می کردم. عده ای پای پست ها علیه این نگرش اعتراض می کردن و ازم می پرسیدن: مقصودم از انتشار این پست ها چیه؟ چرا کتابخوانی رو مذم [...]

    • Garima said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      Her too-lofty dreams, her too-narrow house.We meet and greet different sorts of people; we greet and read different sorts of books. Last year, I had the pleasure of meeting Ms. Jane Eyre. With her modest dreams and dignified living, it was easy to accept and love her. She was far from perfect but there was hardly a thing I would have changed about her. A fictional character of literature exemplifying the virtuous side of real life but she was not alone. There were some other characters surroundi [...]

    • Perry said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      Splendid Sensations of Prose in Lydia Davis' Translation of Madame Bovary Most realize that the novel's basic substance or theme: an adulteress supreme and her poor cuckold hubby. Madame Bovary dreams of literary, romantic adventures with young studs and is one of the most self-centered persons in the Western canon. Yet, it could be that some who haven't read it have no idea of the "ending" ending (which I won't give away here). This is a masterful novel, and maybe one reason it's so affecting i [...]

    • Shannon said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      Why are all the "great classics" lead by famed female heroines all too often about personal freedom thru means of sexual compromise leading to abject misery and ultimate demise? I realize it's an accurate depiction of culture and times, however why are Bovary and Moll Flanders the memorable matriarchs of classic literature? See my commentary on the Awakening for similar frustrations. Why aren't there more works about strong women making a difference in their own lives if not those of their famil [...]

    • Huda Yahya said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      مدام بوفاريهذه المرأة التي لا تدري أتحتقرها أم تبكي عليهاأتشفق على حالها أم تلعنهافيا لكل هذا البؤسويا لكل هذا السخطوربما يكون السخط هو مفتاح الرواية الرئيسيفهو الشعور الذي يمزق إيما لحما ودما وتأوهاتلقد انبثقت تعاستها جزعا ووجعا وتهورا وتمردا‏ولكن الأنكى من هذا كلهخيان [...]

    • Jibran said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      Perhaps she would have liked to confide in someone about all these things. But how does one express an uneasiness so intangible, one that changes shape like a cloud, that changes direction like the wind? She lacked the words, the occasion, the courage.Some blame it on novels packed with sentimentalist kitsch; some point out her too-lofty dreams, her too-narrow house, so that the higher she raised the bar of happiness the harder it got to climb; some direct their anger at her reckless financial t [...]

    • Emma said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      When I first met my husband at a Christmas dinner party hosted by my best friend, he made a joke that I was Emma Bovary. This unflattering comparison was based on my name, French heritage and interest in fashion. Charming.  I made a joke that he was a tosser, we fell madly in love and married not long after. No really, we did. I hadn't read Flaubert's Madame Bovary at that point, but I had heard Emma Bovary was a character without any saving positives. I had also heard that many young women i [...]

    • Vessey said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      I dedicate this review to my dear friends Will, Jeffrey and Sidharth, whose wise words have always inspired meSPOILERS"Did she not seem to be passing through life scarcely touching it, and to bear on her brow the vague impress of some divine destiny? She was so sad and so calm, at once so gentle and so reserved, that near her one felt oneself seized by an icy charmBut she was eaten up with desires, with rage, with hate. That dress with the narrow folds hid a distracted heart, of whose torment th [...]

    • Renato Magalhães Rocha said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      When I start reading a book named after one of its characters, I simply can't help the anxiety to meet them. In this case, I was impatient to finally get acquainted with Madame Bovary.Instead of that, on the opening chapter, we get to see Charles Bovary, the peaceful and shy little boy going to school for the first time. We accompany him while he grows up, study to become a 'doctor' and marry his first wife. After a series of events, he finds and marries his second wife - this time the one - and [...]

    • Parthiban Sekar said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      Why was her life so inadequate? Why did everything she leaned on instantly crumble into dust? These were the questions tormenting Emma (Madame Bovary) in her solitude that she never expected to exist in her nuptial life of which she dreamed. Yet, the gaps widened. The barriers grew stronger."A man, at least is free; he can explore the whole range of the passions, go wherever he likes, overcome obstacles, savor the most exotic pleasures. But a woman is constantly thwarted. Inert and pliable, she [...]

    • Ahmed said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      هي الرواية الخالدة , التي وضعت بداية جديدة لفن الرواية بصفة خاصة وللأدب بصفة عامة , فلوبير لم يكتب مجرد نَص روائي مميز , بل كتب مفترق طرق للأدب , فيقال الرواية قبل (مدام بوڨاري) والرواية بعدها.لطالما كنت من المنبهرين بالأعمال التي تناقش الضعف الإنساني , فهي تُقدم لك الإنسان بسلي [...]

    • Manny said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      Moira posted a terrific review of Rabbit Redux the other day, and it made me realise something I should have noticed years ago. Rabbit Angstrom is Emma Bovary's literary grandson! As Moira says, Updike was deeply influenced by Nabokov, a fact that had somehow passed me by. Nabokov, in his turn, was a disciple of Flaubert; he famously said that he'd read all Flaubert, in the original French, by the time he was 14. So the family tree is clear enough.It's one of those cases, though, where things ha [...]

    • Jason Pettus said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      The CCLaP 100: In which I read a hundred so-called "classics" for the first time, then determine whether or not they deserve the label. Madame Bovary is book #26 of the series.The story in a nutshell:Considered by nearly everyone to be one of the best novels ever written, French cynic Gustave Flaubert's 1857 Madame Bovary (originally published serially in 1856) is one of the first fiction projects in history to be as much a deep "character study" as a vehicle for simply propelling an exciting pl [...]

    • Henry Avila said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      Emma is a rather silly, very passionate ( too much so), bored, uneducated to the reality of the real world, young woman, who believes in the romantic novels she reads, moonlight walks, eerie, forbidding castles, dangerous flights into unknown, and strange lands, always trying to escape their frightening captors brave, handsome men, that are faithful to their beautiful, virtuous women, fighting the evil, monstrous, corrupt, but attractive libertines , and the hero rescuing them in the nick of tim [...]

    • Fabian said:
      Sep 20, 2018 - 00:58 AM

      The first reading of this novel does no justice to its original intended effect. The book must be reread especially if it was first encountered when the reader’s life was still devoid of romance. Not until the second time around do the details linger, memorably, and the speedy plot that Part One promised is detained for the remaining Parts Two and Three which include photographically-intense colors and emotions felt (or, even not felt at all) by Emma Bovary. The plot is carefully-crafted; it i [...]

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