In Death Ground

The Bugs have a superior drive technology, overwhelming numbers, and a strategy that s mind numbingly alien But they have finally encountered a food source that s too stubborn to go down easy For the humans and Orions of the Grand Alliance choosing their strategy was easy the only possible objective in the Fourth Interstellar War was the complete extermination of the BuThe Bugs have a superior drive technology, overwhelming numbers, and a strategy that s mind numbingly alien But they have finally encountered a food source that s too stubborn to go down easy For the humans and Orions of the Grand Alliance choosing their strategy was easy the only possible objective in the Fourth Interstellar War was the complete extermination of the Bugs.
In Death Ground The Bugs have a superior drive technology overwhelming numbers and a strategy that s mind numbingly alien But they have finally encountered a food source that s too stubborn to go down easy For the

  • Title: In Death Ground
  • Author: David Weber SteveWhite
  • ISBN: 9780671877798
  • Page: 227
  • Format: Paperback
    • ✓ In Death Ground || Ë PDF Read by ✓ David Weber SteveWhite
      227 David Weber SteveWhite
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      Posted by:David Weber SteveWhite
      Published :2018-06-22T23:13:44+00:00

    About the Author

    David Weber SteveWhite

    David Mark Weber is an American science fiction and fantasy author He was born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1952.Many of his stories have military, particularly naval, themes, and fit into the military science fiction genre He frequently places female leading characters in what have been traditionally male roles.One of his most popular and enduring characters is Honor Harrington whose alliterated name is an homage to C S Forester s character Horatio Hornblower and her last name from a fleet doctor in Patrick O Brian s Master and Commander Her story, together with the Honorverse she inhabits, has been developed through 16 novels and six shared universe anthologies, as of spring 2013 other works are in production In 2008, he donated his archive to the department of Rare Books and Special Collections at Northern Illinois University.Many of his books are available online, either in their entirety as part of the Baen Free Library or, in the case of recent books, in the form of sample chapters typically the first 25 33% of the work cmillan author davidw

    436 Comment

    • Dirk Grobbelaar said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      This is total war on an interstellar scale. Also, the antagonistic aliens are evil. Period! So not a lot of page time is spent in trying to defend or rationalise their actions. What? They actually eat their enemies? They look like spiders? Kill them all, says I! Yep, that’s more or less the gist of it. These vile alien invaders are following humans into federation space, butchering everything in their path. Humans respond in kind. Only, it seems that the aliens are rather single minded and pur [...]

    • Per Gunnar said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      It’s a good thing that I continued reading this series after having read the first book. The first book is quite okay but, surprisingly, it has little the do with the rest of the series. The first book is not the first in the actual time line to start with and has a lot more space opera and politics in the mix than the following ones.The latter books, including this one, are great books. They are exactly my cup of tea. Very little politics and heavy focus on military strategy in space and, of [...]

    • Mark said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      In Death GroundAuthor: Steve WhitePublisher: BaenPublished In: Riverdale, NYDate: 1997Pgs: 629REVIEW MAY CONTAIN SPOILERSSummary:Humanity has departed the cradle. The discovery of stable warp points throughout the universe has made travel, commerce, and warfare a faster, more lucrative, and more deadly proposition. The Terran Federation Navy defends the Federation. They have stood against the felinoid Orions. And with the Orions against the Rigellians and the Thebans. Warp point surveys are carr [...]

    • Remo said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      Segunda parte de la serie de Starfire. El primero me gustó mucho y en este segundo hay menos de todo salvo batallas espaciales. En una gran guerra de movimientos, presenciamos asalto tras asalto de los Bichos y de la Federación. En algún momento, dado que las batallas son tantas, hay alguna impresión de que las cosas se repiten. pero en general está muy entretenido. ya estoy con la tercera.

    • Bob Gilson said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      Audio book. Great reader he really makes this a fun book. Wow lots of death and destruction in this one. The TFN finds the bugs to be a relentless foe. To the point that the war is continued into the next book. Which I have already added to my Audible app. Exciting space battles and lots of action.

    • Sean Hillman said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      Very good, sets up Shiva Option to be great but the sequel does not measure up to this one. Still lots of lingo and internal monologues.

    • Clay said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      This book covers two fronts to the same war. Sixty years after "Crusade" a Terran survey ship stumbles into an empty system. But it's not so empty. A cloaked picket ship of a new enemy to the Alliance notes the presence of this intruder, reports back, and, thus, a relentless assault on Alliance space begins. And it truly is relentless as the enemy is willing to sacrifice a majority of their ships to gain even a slight advantage during each battle. And there seems to be no end to the Fleet. The f [...]

    • Manta said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      Firstly, title bears absolutely no relation, or even mention to what happens in the book - unless of course, you count the indulgent and massive accounts of starship slaughter and butcherynext: blurb's awful pun on Sun Tzu's name ("one-Tzu-three" really?!) was irrelevant, uncalled for and rather disrespectful for a book that claims to write after the tradition of military navies and strategic thoughttempts at fleshing out characters fail so stupendously. I think I enjoyed reading more about the [...]

    • Scott Holstad said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      This is a big book of space battles. That's all it is. No major plot or back plot. No real character development. No real politics, no religion. Just the Terran Alliance (humans and their several alien allies) against the Bugs, who are spider looking aliens who are suicidal killers who like to eat the people they capture on planets they conquer. This is just battle after battle after battle. It's okay at first, because they're fairly good, but then they get redundant. Fast. After all, how many t [...]

    • Troy G said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      In this book. Humanity and its allies face an extinction event in the form of an invader. This is made most interesting by the fact that humanity knows how to fight this invader. Their tactics and technology are effective at killing the invasion force. But it just doesn't matter."She wasn't fighting a navy. She was fighting an elemental force, something forged in the bowels of Hell to smash anything in its path, and she was afraid. So afraid."The first half of the book follows a series of tactic [...]

    • Marcus Knowles said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      REVIEW: Starfire Series by David Weber & Steve White Another SF series that I picked up on a recommendation. Or perhaps not a recommendation, more of a wondering on that person's description of the books, which I will paraphrase. "A small space battle, followed by a bigger space battle, followed by an even bigger space battle, followed by a desperate space battle, followed by an even more massive and desperate space battle, followed by" As you might guess, these books are about space battl [...]

    • Adam said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      I have tried to finish this book twice. Or was it three times. It doesn't matter because the problems with this text, no matter the number of my attempts or how old I am when I read it, are constant.Imagine you are playing a video game where you control a vast space empire and are charged with defending it against an alien enemy with power fleets. Imagine if you played that game for a few hours, fictionalized the events of the game, every turn, every battle, every explosion and made it a 400+ pa [...]

    • Kenneth said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      In Death Ground (3/5) draws inspiration from Heinlein & Niven for a tale of galactic invasion by bug-like aliens. I enjoyed the "better mouse trap" arms race depicted between the humanity-led federation and the all-consuming Bugs, but the writing can be dry in places as the action reads more like a battle report, and less like a novel.There are a few notable, and well-fleshed out, military characters, but these tend to be admirals or other high-ranking characters. The book occasionally switc [...]

    • Thomas said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      I'm reading this book and I'm feeling 'This reads just like a game of Starfleet Battles'. I do a little bit of research and it turns out that Mr. Weber worked on Starfleet Battles back in the 70's as well as a game called Starfire, upon which this book is based.It's a military procedural in space - in the Tom Clancy vein. Lots of action, pretty much only action as the members of the Terran Federation Navy battle the nearly unstoppable 'bugs' they discover in the first chapter. Beyond a fairly gr [...]

    • Curtiss said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      A grim scenario of humanity and its alien allies encountering an [almost:] unstoppable race of creatures who consider all other species as merely food sources.The first half of the book relates one desperate battle after another as the alien menace advances deep into Terran Federation Space, until finally enough force (and bloody-mindedness) is summoned to halt their advance and bring about a strategic stalemate. The second half details the development of a second front near the heart worlds of [...]

    • Jon said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      They say not to judge a book by its cover, and that's the case here. This is classic military science fiction with strategy, space combat, and nasty stinking bugs which view humans as a food source. At one point, some of the characters are thinking that humans left on the planets they've conquered were just wiped out, but then they find a planet where the inhabitants were being farmed, and had been for hundreds if not thousands of years. The book ends after a campaign were more than 200,000 memb [...]

    • Patrick Scheele said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      Military science fiction. It's not an easy read, it can be downright brutal to read of all the battles and all the losses and then to realize that in spite of victory, the bugs are still out there and they will keep on coming.From the start, it was clear to me, that there wasn't going to be any kind of scientific breakthrough or ancient artifact or alien intervention that would suddenly win the war for the good guys. The bugs don't seem to have an Achilles' heel either. In ordinary SF, one of th [...]

    • Jim said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      This book is truly an old friend. If you are a fan of military history, military science fiction, and futuristic military technology, this book is a must read. White and Weber describe military strategy and technology in great detail, while only presenting their characters with the broadest of brush strokes. In many ways, this book presages Weber's later Honor Harrington series. The book ends in the middle of story, so if you like it, be prepared to read The Shiva Option as well.

    • Aaron Anderson said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      This is the start of a 2 book mini-series within the overall series. It's far more plot-driven than character-driven. I love both this and Shiva Option. 4.5 stars, but can't give it a 5.Reread again. Still one of my favorite books of its type.--------------Reread this once again (end of 2016). I swear every other year at least, I want to reread book 3 and 4. The others are medium at best, but 3 and 4 are so freakin' amazing. It's nice to have brutal space-war with no holds barred. No subtleties. [...]

    • Larry said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      600+ pages of pretty much nonstop space combat. This was fun at first,but it got tiresome after a while. And there's a 'to be continued' ending.Reminded me at times of the Skylark series of E. E. 'Doc' Smith, or of'The Mote in God's Eye'.The Orion species bore a suspicious resemblance to the Kzinti. Oh, and there'sanother friendly race called the Gorm (like in Star Trek).Overall, the execution didn't quite live up to the cool premise.

    • Charlie George said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      Chocked full of great military sci-fi battles, techs and tactics, but ruined by lousy writing. I'm talking soap-opera direct dialogue, extreme 1-D characterization, deplorable psychology, and too too much military cheerleading.Memo to Mr. Weber: There is a way to get across the point that civilians don't appreciate the protection provided by soldiers, without spelling it out, literally, over and over.

    • Brad said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      The 4 star rating is based on the relentless battle sequences throughout this book. The feature of almost non-stop fighting may not appeal to other readers. In Death Ground lacks the balance of political plotting or scheming of background characters that make a well rounded military sci fi book. However, if you want to read sci-fi action sequences that never let up, give this a try.

    • Ralph McEwen said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      A grand and glorious tale that is well reviewed by previous reviewers. I was enjoying this book enough that when I lost the book half way through, I searched high and low until I finally tracked down another copy through my library several months later. I am glad I did and am very much look forward to reading the next book in the series.

    • Nathan said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      A much more typical military SF than The Forever War. Interstellar naval combat and a lot of it. And again. And again. Character development? What's that? Background exposition or descriptive prose? What's that? A rather one dimensional work, which is fair enough, since the space battles seem to take place on a plain as well. Rated PG for some violence. 2.5/5

    • John somers said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      Excellent sequel to Crusade set 60 years later. The descriptions of left wing politicians are ridiculous (bitching about the navy provoking war with a newly encountered race of carnivorous aliens that look on humans as a handy food source) but I like the setting, the various alien races are nicely developed through the series and the development of technology during the books is well done.

    • Nikola Tasev said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      Felt like a report from a computer game. A good computer game, mind you, epic and full of crafty strategy, but still lacking characters and human side. A little better than reading the arms race in tanks and aircraft during World War II.

    • Lisa said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      In Death Ground by David Weber (1997)

    • QFrost said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      Awesome read - perfect fleet actions in a space opera, just the right mix of combat, tactical and strategic battles. Excellent characters.

    • Steve said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      Starfire

    • Sean Evans said:
      Sep 21, 2018 - 23:13 PM

      In Death Ground by David Weber (1997)

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