Great Work of Time

His name is Caspar Last, and this is the unique chronicle of the vacation he took from the twentieth century It begins or does it when Caspar, a genius, poor of course, and resentful at that, decides to use his time machine to bring back a modest fortune It begins or maybe it doesn t with a mysterious bequest to a secret Otherhood charged with preserving and eHis name is Caspar Last, and this is the unique chronicle of the vacation he took from the twentieth century It begins or does it when Caspar, a genius, poor of course, and resentful at that, decides to use his time machine to bring back a modest fortune It begins or maybe it doesn t with a mysterious bequest to a secret Otherhood charged with preserving and extending the British Empire at any cost From the bold colonial days of empire builder Cecil Rhodes through the wide eyed and wondrous possibilities of the present to a strange and haunting future of magi and angels, of men and many races other than our own, John Crowley s time travel masterpiece surfs bravely along the infinite, infinitely broken coastline of Time to tell a story that takes place neither here nor there, but everywhen.
Great Work of Time His name is Caspar Last and this is the unique chronicle of the vacation he took from the twentieth century It begins or does it when Caspar a genius poor of course and resentful at that decides

  • Title: Great Work of Time
  • Author: John Crowley
  • ISBN: 9780553293197
  • Page: 103
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
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      Published :2018-04-17T17:23:09+00:00

    About the Author

    John Crowley

    Librarian Note There is than one author in the database with this name See this thread for information.John Crowley was born in Presque Isle, Maine, in 1942 his father was then an officer in the US Army Air Corps He grew up in Vermont, northeastern Kentucky and for the longest stretch Indiana, where he went to high school and college He moved to New York City after college to make movies, and did find work in documentary films, an occupation he still pursues He published his first novel The Deep in 1975, and his 15th volume of fiction Endless Things in 2007 Since 1993 he has taught creative writing at Yale University In 1992 he received the Award in Literature from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters.His first published novels were science fiction The Deep 1975 and Beasts 1976 Engine Summer 1979 was nominated for the 1980 American Book Award it appears in David Pringle s 100 Best Science Fiction Novels.In 1981 came Little, Big, which Ursula Le Guin described as a book that all by itself calls for a redefinition of fantasy In 1980 Crowley embarked on an ambitious four volume novel, gypt, comprising The Solitudes originally published as gypt , Love Sleep, D monomania, and Endless Things, published in May 2007 This series and Little, Big were cited when Crowley received the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Letters Award for Literature.He is also the recipient of an Ingram Merrill Foundation grant His recent novels are The Translator, recipient of the Premio Flaianno Italy , and Lord Byron s Novel The Evening Land, which contains an entire imaginary novel by the poet A novella, The Girlhood of Shakespeare s Heroines, appeared in 2002 A museum quality 25th anniversary edition of Little, Big, featuring the art of Peter Milton and a critical introduction by Harold Bloom, is in preparation.Note The John Crowley who wrote Sans pines, la rose Tony Blair, un mod le pour l Europe is a different author with the same name website

    396 Comment

    • Daniel said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      I will be thinking about this book for a long time."Great Work of Time" is a story about people who travel through time. The plot centers on the British Empire and its influence throughout its colonies, most specifically its African holdings. Naturally, the actions of these time travelers have consequences that spread throughout the continuum of time and space, altering everything they touch.This general theory of effect is nothing new to the genre of time-travel, yet in his explication of this [...]

    • Jerry Jose said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      “It amuses me,” Sir Geoffrey said, “how constant it is in human nature to think that things might have gone on differently from the way they did. In a man’s own life, first of all: how he might have taken this or that very different route, except for this or that accident, this or that slight push—if he’d only known then, and so on. And then in history as well, we ruminate endlessly, if, what if, if only The world seems always somehow malleable to our minds, or to our imaginations an [...]

    • Lars Dradrach said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      A small gem of a time travel story focused on the British Empire keeping its world domination and maintaining its African colonies.It’s cleverly constructed and beautifully written with a at times complex language, which challenges a reader like me who not native English spoken.It’s probably a book I will return to and enjoy even more the second time around.

    • Walford said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      Absolutely have to reread this every five years or so. The most intricate and haunting time-travel story I've ever encountered, impossible to describe (or remember, for that matter).Please be aware that you can also find it in Novelties and Souvenirs: Collected Short Fiction

    • Dylan said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      A mind-boggling, highly literate take on time travel, the necessity of evil, and the character of British rule. It would be a mistake to dimiss this as a simple mobius story - it's more complex and thoughtful than that description implies, and at novella-length, richer than most longer works.

    • Christopher Sutch said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      A devastating novel about imperialism and time travel. A little gem.

    • Joseph Copeli said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      [This review also appears on FingerFlow, a site for review and discussion of creative works.]Consider the following scenario: you are granted one trip to any time in the past. You cannot bring anything with you to the past or back to the future that will not fit in your pocket. You must take extreme care not to alter history or to alter it as little as possible. How would you make yourself rich? Buying the stock of a rich company in escrow for your unborn self wouldn’t work and buying rare art [...]

    • Adam said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      Crowley proved his master-craftsmanship in Little, Big, a work that embodies its seed-idea with a grace and entirety few other authors have accomplished (Barry Lopez is the only one who comes to mind, able to communicate the most peculiar and ineffable feelings). I was looking forward to regaining the magic of Crowley's works with this book, but I apparently flubbed it, because that didn't happen - I read the book at a Magic: the Gathering tournament in a jet-lagged exhaustion, so I probably did [...]

    • Bjorn Larsen said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      Just Read: Great Work of Time (1991) - John CrowleySome novels you try to avoid synopsis because the story is too joyful in its own unfolding. Other novels lend themselves nicely to synopsis; and in some novels you wouldn’t know where to start. There are a few authors, also, towards whom I have to disclose an underlying bias (I think Harold Bloom admitted as much in this case) - John Crowley is one of these. In Great Work of Time these two conditions intersect. Crowley has been a favourite of [...]

    • Fantasy Literature said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      In 1990, Great Work of Time won the World Fantasy Award for best novella. I’m surprised someone hasn’t snapped up John Crowley’s short book, given it a glossy steampunk cover, and re-released it. Of course it isn’t steampunk. John Crowley’s work doesn’t fit easily into any sub-genre except Things John Crowley Has Written. Still, Great Work of Time has enough of the British Empire, airships, alternate histories, train terminals, misty London cityscapes, and men with bowler hats and ti [...]

    • Jessica said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      An interesting jaunt through time, not strictly backwards or forwards. Focusing on the danger of stagnation (in the form of perpetual peace) and the equally dangerous notion that violence is a necessary means to a supposedly desirable end. This is certainly not a book of answers, as both interfering with time, and leaving it alone, seem to have enormous and unpleasant repercussions. Crowley somehow manages to weave otherworldly beings (draconics, magi, angels), stamp collecting, the British Empi [...]

    • M said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      An adorable little minor work I found for a dollar used that basically makes Asimov's "the End of Eternity" about the British Empire, with great big dollops of 19th and early 20th century penny dreadfuls tossed in. Complete with secret time travelers funded by Cecil Rhodes! Utter fluff, but the language is great and it's a fun ride. Can't believe it won a World Fantasy Award, but it does feel like he's working up to the "there is more than one history of the world" speech in the Aegypt books, an [...]

    • Eric said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      If Marty McFly made you bite your nails in anticipation of his demise, don't read this. You'll rip your arm hair out. Time travel should never banned in all capitalist countries.

    • James said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      A beautiful, lyrical meditation on time from John Crowley, the most underrated contemporary American novelist. Forget H.G. Wells, this is the masterpiece of time-travel stories.

    • Jake said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      Not a big fan of alternate histories, but well told.

    • Matthew Martens said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 17:23 PM

      minor crowley, but not without fascination.

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