Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions

Flatland is one of the very few novels about math and philosophy that can appeal to almost any layperson Published in 1880, this short fantasy takes us to a completely flat world of two physical dimensions where all the inhabitants are geometric shapes, and who think the planar world of length and width that they know is all there is But one inhabitant discovers the exisFlatland is one of the very few novels about math and philosophy that can appeal to almost any layperson Published in 1880, this short fantasy takes us to a completely flat world of two physical dimensions where all the inhabitants are geometric shapes, and who think the planar world of length and width that they know is all there is But one inhabitant discovers the existence of a third physical dimension, enabling him to finally grasp the concept of a fourth dimension Watching our Flatland narrator, we begin to get an idea of the limitations of our own assumptions about reality, and we start to learn how to think about the confusing problem of higher dimensions The book is also quite a funny satire on society and class distinctions of Victorian England.
Flatland A Romance of Many Dimensions Flatland is one of the very few novels about math and philosophy that can appeal to almost any layperson Published in this short fantasy takes us to a completely flat world of two physical dimen

  • Title: Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions
  • Author: Edwin A. Abbott
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 225
  • Format: Kindle Edition
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      Published :2018-04-09T19:31:11+00:00

    About the Author

    Edwin A. Abbott

    From Biography Base Edwin Abbott Abbott December 20, 1838 1926 , English schoolmaster and theologian, is best known as the author of the mathematical satire Flatland 1884.He was educated at the City of London School and at St John s College, Cambridge, where he took the highest honours in classics, mathematics and theology, and became fellow of his college In 1862 he took orders After holding masterships at King Edward s School, Birmingham, and at Clifton College, he succeeded G F Mortimer as headmaster of the City of London School in 1865 at the early age of twenty six He was Hulsean lecturer in 1876.He retired in 1889, and devoted himself to literary and theological pursuits Dr Abbott s liberal inclinations in theology were prominent both in his educational views and in his books His Shakespearian Grammar 1870 is a permanent contribution to English philology In 1885 he published a life of Francis Bacon His theological writings include three anonymously published religious romances Philochristus 1878 , Onesimus 1882 , and Sitanus 1906.More weighty contributions are the anonymous theological discussion The Kernel and the Husk 1886 , Philomythus 1891 , his book The Anglican Career of Cardinal Newman 1892 , and his article The Gospels in the ninth edition of the Encyclop dia Britannica, embodying a critical view which caused considerable stir in the English theological world He also wrote St Thomas of Canterbury, his Death and Miracles 1898 , Johannine Vocabulary 1905 , Johannine Grammar 1906 Flatland was published in 1884.His brother, Evelyn Abbott 1843 1901 , was a well known tutor of Balliol College, Oxford, and author of a scholarly history of Greece.

    494 Comment

    • Stephen said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      Take a classically styled, 19th century satire about Victorian social mores…dress it up in dimensional geometry involving anthropomorphized shapes (e.g lines, squares, cubes, etc.)…bathe it in the sweet, scented waters of social commentary…and wrap it all around humble, open-minded Square as protagonist. The result is Flatland, a unique “classic” parked at the intersection of a number of different genres, thus pinging the radar of a wider than normal audience to appreciate (or detest) [...]

    • Robert said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      When you read this book, keep two things in mind. First, it was written back in 1880, when relativity had not yet been invented, when quantum theory was not yet discovered, when only a handful of mathematicians had the courage (yet) to challenge Euclid and imagine curved space geometries and geometries with infinite dimensionality. As such, it is an absolutely brilliant work of speculative mathematics deftly hidden in a peculiar but strangely amusing social satire.Second, its point, even about i [...]

    • Michael Finocchiaro said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      A curious little novella about a man a two-dimensional world thinking literally out of the box. First he explains his world in which the angles you have the higher social status you have in Flatland - Circles being the highest rank. He meets someone from Lineland (one-dimensional) who is incapable of understanding Flatland and he meets Sphere from Spaceland (three dimenions) and he is able himself to comprehend the difference between "up" and "North". However, Sphere cannot extrapolate to 4+ dim [...]

    • Duane said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      I give it an extra star for it's originality, it's uniqueness. The concept was genius, Abbott was probably a math genius himself. However, as a work of literature it does not hold up well. It has a shadowy similarity to Gulliver's Travels, but falls well short of that Swift classic.

    • Dan said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      This book should not be read in hopes of finding an entertaining story. As a novel, it's terrible. It's plot (if you can call it that) is simple and contrived. But, it wasn't written as a novel.Flatland is a mathematical essay, meant to explain a point: that higher dimensions (more than length, depth and width) may be present in our universe, but if they are, it will be nearly impossible for us to understand them.The story itself consists of a two dimensional world (Flatland), in which there are [...]

    • Apatt said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      “I used to be a renegade, I used to fool around But I couldn't take the punishment and had to settle down Now I'm playing it real straight, and yes, I cut my hair You might think I'm crazy, but I don't even care Because I can tell what's going onIt's hip to be square”Huey Lewis And The News - Hip To Be SquareAccording to , several film adaptations have been made of Flatland, but no blockbusting Pixar / DreamWorks extravaganza just yet. If they do make one I can’t imagine a more appropriate [...]

    • Kinga said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      This was one crazy, opium fuelled, brilliant book about geometry and different dimensions and I am going to explain it the best way I can but Edwin A Abbott does it so much better.Here is a story of Square who is a square and lives in a two dimensional world of geometrical figures. The first part of the book talks about the social breakdown of the Flatland and it is a thinly disguised satire on the Victorian society. People are divided into classes according to their geometry and the worst off a [...]

    • Saleh MoonWalker said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      Onvan : Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions - Nevisande : Edwin A. Abbott - ISBN : 048627263X - ISBN13 : 9780486272634 - Dar 96 Safhe - Saal e Chap : 1884

    • Nandakishore Varma said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      At the outset the 5 stars are entirely subjective. I love maths, I love playing mathematical games, I love philosophising about maths. So this book is perfect for me. But if maths is not your cup of tea, you may not enjoy it as much as I did.I first read about this book in one of Martin Gardner's "Mathematical Games" anthologies, and was enthralled by the concept. (In fact, he discusses two books: Flatland by Edwin A. Abbot and An Episode of Flatland by Charles Hinton written with the same premi [...]

    • Julie Demar said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      Un racconto fantastico a più dimensioni con una velata (neanche poi troppo) critica alla chiusura mentale. Geniale.

    • Luana said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      Questo libricino è talmente matto e bello che dovete andare a comprarlo, e siccome so che le mie maniere dispotiche, e poco convincenti (purtroppo non ho le doti dei venditori di cose inutili che riescono a farti comprare di tutti convincendoti che siano utili)forse non vi indurranno all'acquisto, armatevi di convincitudine vostra, e andate a comprarvelo, o a rubarlo, o a prenderlo in prestito dalla biblioteca.Perché? Leggete quanto segue Se come me siete sempre stati delle perfetteschiappe in [...]

    • Paul said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      What a fantastic little thought-experiment, only really half-disguised as a story. Through his witty little parable, Abbott manages to explore the physical, mathematical, societal, philosophical and theological without once spoon-feeding his readers (OK, maybe there's a little bit of spoon-feeding in the earlier chapters).It's only a shame, then, that this is without a doubt the most misogynist book I've ever read in my forty-odd years Oh, well; I suppose nothing's perfect

    • Mark said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      The premise of Flatland is just that - a two dimensional flatland. As described early in the book, place a coin on a bench and look at the side from a distance. The coin will appear as just a line as does the view of everything in Flatland.Written in the late 1800's by a school head master and maths and science teacher, this book feels more of a vessel for him to prove his superior intelligence through the grasp of these geometric concepts than an actual entertaining read.The book is narrated to [...]

    • Jan-Maat said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      The narrator, a shape living in a two-dimensional universe, has his thought-world turned upside down went he meets a mysterious being from a three-dimensional world. 3D creature proceeds to blow 2D creature's mind by exposing him (view spoiler)[ indeed gender apparently is trans-dimensional (hide spoiler)] to 1 dimensional world, who however in turn refuses to accept the possibility of 4, or more D , world (s). This notion of perspective and liberation from one's own perspective gives the work a [...]

    • Roy Lotz said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      For why should you praise, for example, the integrity of a Square who faithfully defends the interests of his client, when you ought in reality rather to admire the exact precision of his right angles? Or again, why blame a lying Isosceles, when you ought rather to deplore the incurable inequality of his sides? This is one of those delightful little books, so difficult to review because its charms require no toil to appreciate, and also because the book is so short you might as well read it and [...]

    • Alice Cai said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      5*A world where every character is a shape, but only seen on a side view so everybody looks like a straight line. That's why the would is called flatland because everything is in 2 dimensionsIS IS THE BEST BOOK I HAVE EVER READ! It's so trippy and it's really funny too. I can't just give funny quotes though because you need to know the context from the beginning of the chapter and then the context of the chapter before that to get the humor.Some quotes to give an idea of what the book is like:"P [...]

    • Jafar said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      This book is just brilliant. Written by a British mathematician in 1881, it’s a short fantasy novel about life in two dimensions. People in this book live in a two-dimensional world. They're not aware of, or can't even imagine, the third dimension. They have simple geometrical shapes like triangles and squares and other polygons. The higher the number of the sides, the higher the individual is in the social hierarchy. Those who have so many sides that they resemble a circle are priests. The la [...]

    • Milica Chotra said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      "Flatland" is a mathematical satire and religious allegory, written in the shape of the memoirs of A Square, an inhabitant of a two-dimensional world, who had visited other lands - Pointland, Lineland and Spaceland - and gained invaluable insights into the structure of the Universe. Though these journeys and dreams/visions sound like a religious experience (and Edwin Abbott himself was a theologian), the main goal of "Flatland" - to make us think outside the observable world and imagine new dime [...]

    • Matteo Fumagalli said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      Videorecensione: youtube/watch?v=i-UCR

    • Nojoud said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      ثاني تجاربي المقالية :Dلم يعد للزمن سلطان، فكاتب روايتنا التي تعود للقرن الثامن عشر يناقش وجود أبعاد أخرى! سننحدر إلى أرضٍ عجيبة ببُعدين مكانين فقط، نتجوّل ونستطلع حياةَ سكّانها وطريقة معيشتهم الفريدة من نوعها مع القاص، السّيد (مربع) المبشِّر الوحيد ببعدٍ ثالث في أرض مسطحة!؟ [...]

    • Harry Whitewolf said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      Don't be a square - read this book by A. Square; the author of this tale who describes the worlds of Pointland, Lineland, Flatland and Spaceland and the idea of other lands which mathematically and logically lie beyond the latter. This book has just joined the ranks of my all time favourite classics of original genius, such as Micromegas, The Little Prince and Ways of Seeing. In fact, this book's better than those three combined. Simply brilliant.

    • George said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      Quite a charming allegory for the English society of the time, and boy does it show it's age. This is basically covered by everyone who reviewed this book, so I am not going to talk about that. What I noticed and I haven't seen anybody mention this yet, is the fact that at the time when this book was written Darwinian evolution has already grasped popular imagination. Just look how he talked about careful pairings between man and women to produce an equilateral triangle and then how each generat [...]

    • محمد على عطية said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      فكرة مبتكرة و رائعة. الرواية تدور في عالم ثنائي الأبعاد تعيش فيه مجموعة من الأشكال المختلفة بدءاً من الخط المستقيم مروراً بالمثلث و المربع و الأشكال متعددة الأضلاع وصولاً للدائرة. كل هذه الأشكال تتحرك في بعدين فقط، و ما يقرب من نصف الكتاب يصف هذا المجتمع و هرميته و كيفية المع [...]

    • Debbie Zapata said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      I should not have tried to read this book. I do not have a mathematical imagination. I only read it (okay, tried to read it) because GR friend Jaksen suggested it as a companion piece to a short science fiction story I recently read titled The 4-D Doodler. I liked the idea, and the blurb made the book sound clever.But there were diagrams! And geometry talk! And I felt like I was back in math class falling far far behind. I will probably be one of the few readers who enjoyed the first section of [...]

    • Mohammad Ali said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      تخیل نویسنده در ساختن و گزینش جهانی دوبعدی و نمایش محدودیت بشری در مقایسه ی این جهان با جهان سه بعدی ما، تحسین برانگیز است. همچنین نمودهای الهیاتی این اثر نیز جای تأمل داردگاهی ما در جهان های تخیلی با تناظر تک تک امور با جهان واقعی روبروئیم؛ در این حالت گویی هر موجودی در جهان ت [...]

    • Amir said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      ماجرا، داستان مربعی است در یک سرزمین دو بعدی، سرزمینی که همه چیز در اون مسطح هست. برای اینکه تصور کنید آدمای این سرزمین چه دیدی داشتن، یک سکه رو روی میز تصور کنید، حالا نگاهتون رو پایین بیارید تا جایی که همسطح با اون سکه بشید، چیزی که خواهید دید یک خط خواهد بود، شبیه چیزی که ساک [...]

    • aPriL does feral sometimes said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      'Flatland' is amazing. Dimensions are the point of the tale. And the line, the square and the solid cube. (Sorry about being so oblique, but I often angle for a laugh at the beginning of a review, no matter how circuitous.)The author Edwin Abbott Abbott with a wink and a smile introduces us to the science of geometry in the Victorian Age in this (a)cute story about A. Square. To understand the concepts that these surprisingly charming fantasy characters who live in a two-dimensional world illust [...]

    • Scarlet Cameo said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      "Estar satisfecho de sí mismo es ser ruin e ignorante, y [tener] algo a que aspirar es mejor que ser ciega e impotentemente feliz"Este libro ha significado para mi una grata sorpresa. Lo comencé con incredulidad, dada su fama de libro didáctico de matemáticas, con lo cuál cumple en aspectos que son muy sencillos de entender, pero al mismo tiempo cuenta con una historia que bien podría pasar, en parte, como una muy rara distopía (aunque tampoco podría simplemente embolsarlo en ese genero) [...]

    • Abu Hasan said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      أعطيت الرواية 4 نجمات، مع تفهمي لمن يقرأها ولا يعطيها أكثر من نجمة أو نجمتينسأحاول التحدث عنها باختصار دون إحراق أحداثها على من يرغب بقراءتهافكرة الرواية برأيي عبقرية، فهي تتحدث عن عالم مسطح، عالم من بُعدين اثنين فقط، تعيش فيه أشكال هندسية: مثلثات ومربعات ومسدسات،الرواية ت [...]

    • Kyle said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:31 PM

      The quintessential thinking person's book. This book has inspired physicists, philosophers, and others for generations and has had a profound impact on the modern human intellect. Even with all the wonderful and hilarious satire regarding Victorian society aside, few literary works manage to pack as much punch into so small a package as Flatland.Additionally, it's tremendously accessible and easy to understand for someone who may not know what the book is about to begin with. So grab a relaxing [...]

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