The Midwestern Native Garden: Native Alternatives to Nonnative Flowers and Plants

Winner of the 2012 Helen Hull Award, presented by the National Garden Clubs.Midwestern gardeners and landscapers are becoming increasingly attracted to noninvasive regional native wildflowers and plants over popular nonnative species The Midwestern Native Garden offers viable alternatives to both amateurs and professionals, whether they are considering adding a few nativeWinner of the 2012 Helen Hull Award, presented by the National Garden Clubs.Midwestern gardeners and landscapers are becoming increasingly attracted to noninvasive regional native wildflowers and plants over popular nonnative species The Midwestern Native Garden offers viable alternatives to both amateurs and professionals, whether they are considering adding a few native plants or intending to go native all the way Native plants improve air and water quality, reduce use of pesticides, and provide vital food and reproductive sites to birds and butterflies, that nonnative plants cannot offer, helping bring back a healthy ecosystem.The authors provide a comprehensive selection of native alternatives that look similar or even identical to a range of nonnative ornamentals These are native plants that are suitable for all garden styles, bloom during the same season, and have the same cultivation requirements as their nonnative counterparts Plant entries are accompanied by nature notes setting out the specific birds and butterflies the native plants attract.The Midwestern Native Garden will be a welcome guide to gardeners whose styles range from formal to naturalistic but who want to create an authentic sense of place, with regional natives The beauty, hardiness, and easy maintenance of native Midwestern plants will soon make them the new favorites.
The Midwestern Native Garden Native Alternatives to Nonnative Flowers and Plants Winner of the Helen Hull Award presented by the National Garden Clubs Midwestern gardeners and landscapers are becoming increasingly attracted to noninvasive regional native wildflowers and plan

  • Title: The Midwestern Native Garden: Native Alternatives to Nonnative Flowers and Plants
  • Author: Charlotte Adelman Bernard L. Schwartz
  • ISBN: 9780821419373
  • Page: 433
  • Format: Paperback
    • Best Download [Charlotte Adelman Bernard L. Schwartz] Ë The Midwestern Native Garden: Native Alternatives to Nonnative Flowers and Plants || [Self Help Book] PDF ✓
      433 Charlotte Adelman Bernard L. Schwartz
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      Posted by:Charlotte Adelman Bernard L. Schwartz
      Published :2018-04-23T19:23:02+00:00

    About the Author

    Charlotte Adelman Bernard L. Schwartz

    Charlotte Adelman Bernard L. Schwartz Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Midwestern Native Garden: Native Alternatives to Nonnative Flowers and Plants book, this is one of the most wanted Charlotte Adelman Bernard L. Schwartz author readers around the world.

    168 Comment

    • Candy said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:23 PM

      Feb 2013This book is AMAZINGLY helpful in showing what plants you have, and what you might plant that is similar and ALSO native to the midwest. The book is divided by seasons. What I liked best was the information on what bees, moths, butterflies, birds and wild life each plant attracts. I had to read the half page about goldenrod to my husband- it is astounding!!Working with this book along side my Prarie Moon Catalog, I have decided on some native plants to add to several existing flower beds [...]

    • Annie said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:23 PM

      Of the three books, this one is the only one specific to native plant gardening in the Midwest and so I was the most interested in it from the start. However, the organization is nonintuitive and frustrating. The subtitle reads "native alternatives to nonnative flowers and plants" and this is how the book is organized. First it is organized by season, then alphabetically by nonnative plant. Each nonnative plant is described and then native alternatives are offered. This means that one native may [...]

    • Steven McKay said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:23 PM

      It's taken me a while, but I've finally figured out what bothers me about this book: its organization.The author seems to have assumed that the reader knows what they like (hostas, tulips, vinca, etc.) and has decided to replace them with native plants. Consequently, the reader can look up the plant to be replaced and find alternatives. If, however, the reader is looking for a summer flowering groundcover, they have to first look up the non-native versions (sorted by common name and season of bl [...]

    • Jeff Bleijerveld said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:23 PM

      Who those of you who can't understand why your new plants always seem to be suffering, (or die), and for those who wonder why destructive pests out number the butterflies you so desire, this is the book for you. The use of native plants ensures that what you've planted will actually thrive in your area. Native plant support the local birds, insects, and of course, those butterflies. Additionally, the improve air and water quality, reduce the need for pesticides, and provide vital food and reprod [...]

    • Sonya said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:23 PM

      This is a very good for for those who would like to learn more about native wildflowers. We are becoming increasingly aware how the decline in native species is harmful for certain insects and animals and this book can help show how incorporating natives can be done without looking "weedy" if done right in the design of your garden. It gives a list of non-natives (which can be surprising) and native alternatives. Some plants look like they might be native but are just "naturalized" imports. Also [...]

    • Steve H said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:23 PM

      A very useful collection of alternatives to non-native plants, arranged by season of bloom. So, in Spring you find a listing of daffodils and bleeding hearts and all those other plants we're accustomed to see blooming, along with features of the non-native plants. After that you get suggested alternatives that have similar characteristics (similar size, conditions, bloom time) but are native to the Midwest. Often the differences are slight like using a wild variety of a geranium or hyacinth inst [...]

    • Linda Prieskorn said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:23 PM

      This is a reference book for gardeners. It talks about the plants that appear in most gardens and tell the native replacement for it. Chapters are the seasons and it discusses what you can expect in each season. Native plants are hosts and food sources and places where insects lay eggs. The purpose of reading this book was to mentally check off what should/sould be replaced in my garden beds to attract more bees, butterflies, hummingbirds - in general more pollinators. I will be referring back t [...]

    • University of Chicago Magazine said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:23 PM

      Charlotte Adelman, AB'59, JD'62CoauthorFrom our pages (Jan–Feb/12): "Illinoisans Charlotte Adelman and her husband recommend ways to incorporate native Midwest flora, such as butterfly milkweed and tall prairie grasses, into local gardens. Nonnative plants threaten indigenous ones and the wildlife that depend on them. Because some gardeners like the look of the nonnative plants, the authors suggest native flowers that look similar to invasive species, or grow at similar rates, to replace them. [...]

    • Shannon said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:23 PM

      This one has a great premise but a difficult layout. It's divided by seasons and then by non-native plants with their native counterparts. We were looking more for something to help us determine if said native plant would do well in said conditions, like shady backyard. This one requires the leap of knowing what non-natives work and then looking for native substitutions.

    • Sheri Bauer said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:23 PM

      This belongs on any native gardeners bookshelf.

    • Micebyliz said:
      Jul 17, 2018 - 19:23 PM

      I found this book to be really informative. It's kind of a reference book rather than a how-to. The only thing i found a bit annoying? :) was that nonnative plants were listed in red as if you were doing something wrong by planting them. Kind of like certain poisons or god forbid banned books!! :)

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