Sharpe's Devil

Five years after the battle of Waterloo, Sharpe s peaceful retirement in Normandy is shattered by a plea for help An old friend, Don Blas Vivar, is missing in Chile, reported dead at rebel hands a report his wife refuses to believe.
Sharpe s Devil Five years after the battle of Waterloo Sharpe s peaceful retirement in Normandy is shattered by a plea for help An old friend Don Blas Vivar is missing in Chile reported dead at rebel hands a rep

  • Title: Sharpe's Devil
  • Author: Bernard Cornwell
  • ISBN: 9780007235179
  • Page: 331
  • Format: Paperback
  • Sharpe s Devil Richard Sharpe the Emperor, From New York Times bestselling author Bernard Cornwell, another exciting adventure in the world renowned Sharpe series, chronicling the rise of Richard Sharpe, a Private in His Majesty s Army at the siege of Seringapatam Five years after the Battle of Waterloo, Sharpe s peaceful retirement in Sharpe s Company TV programme Sharpe s Company is a British television drama, the third of a series that follows the career of Richard Sharpe, a British soldier during the Napoleonic Wars.This episode is based on the novel of the same name by Bernard Cornwell. Plot It is General Wellesley Hugh Fraser is ready to invade Spain from Portugal.But two formidable Sharpe s Revenge TV programme Sharpe s Revenge is a British television drama, the th of a series that follows the career of Richard Sharpe, a British soldier during the Napoleonic Wars.The adaptation is based on the novel of the same name by Bernard Cornwell. Plot summary Sharpe participates in the Battle of Toulouse, at the end of the Peninsular War.On the other Sharpe s Adventures Sharpe s Enemy Portugal Action and romance follow Sharpe as his chosen men risk their lives on dangerous and heroic missions Sharpe has to do battle with a gang of deserters led by an evil renegade, who uses hostages including Sharpe s old flame as innocent pawns in his wicked game to win a ransom. The Sharpe Family Cast of Characters Everything you wanted to know about Richard Sharpe but were afraid to ask. Sharpe s Story Bernard SHARPE S EAGLE wasn t written in a hurry I had never written a book before and really had no idea how to go about it Of course, I knew I needed a hero, but I never once sat down and tried to delineate him in my mind instead I let him develop as I wrote the book. About the Sharpe Books Bernard Cornwell About the Sharpe Books I began writing Sharpe in and he s still going strong I never thought there would be this many books I imagined there might be ten or eleven but then along came Sean Bean and the television programmes and I virtually began a whole new Sharpe series. Ciaran Brown meets actress Julie T Wallace Ciaran Brown meets actress Julie T Wallace, best known as Ruth in The Life and Loves of a She Devil Bernard Cornwell Bernard Cornwell Londra, febbraio uno scrittore britannico. Dopo aver lavorato a lungo nella BBC, si dedicato interamente alla letteratura, specializzandosi in romanzi storici e d avventura. noto per la serie di romanzi incentrata sulle avventure di Richard Sharpe, per la quadrilogia dedicata alla ricerca del Sacro Graal e per la saga de Il Vernon Dobtcheff Vernon Dobtcheff, Actor Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade Vernon Dobtcheff was born on August , in Nmes, Gard, France He is an actor, known for Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade , The Day of the Jackal

    • Best Read [Bernard Cornwell] · Sharpe's Devil || [Fiction Book] PDF ¾
      331 Bernard Cornwell
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Bernard Cornwell] · Sharpe's Devil || [Fiction Book] PDF ¾
      Posted by:Bernard Cornwell
      Published :2018-04-14T04:46:25+00:00

    About the Author

    Bernard Cornwell

    Cornwell was born in London in 1944 His father was a Canadian airman, and his mother, who was English, a member of the Women s Auxiliary Air Force He was adopted and brought up in Essex by the Wiggins family, who were members of the Peculiar People, a strict Protestant sect who banned frivolity of all kinds and even medicine After he left them, he changed his name to his birth mother s maiden name, Cornwell.Cornwell was sent away to Monkton Combe School, attended the University of London, and after graduating, worked as a teacher He attempted to enlist in the British armed services at least three times but was rejected on the grounds of myopia.He then joined BBC s Nationwide and was promoted to become head of current affairs at BBC Northern Ireland He then joined Thames Television as editor of Thames News He relocated to the United States in 1980 after marrying an American Unable to get a green card, he started writing novels, as this did not require a work permit.As a child, Cornwell loved the novels of C.S Forester, chronicling the adventures of fictional British naval officer Horatio Hornblower during the Napoleonic Wars, and was surprised to find there were no such novels following Lord Wellington s campaign on land Motivated by the need to support himself in the U.S through writing, Cornwell decided to write such a series He named his chief protagonist Richard Sharpe, a rifleman involved in most major battles of the Peninsular War.Cornwell wanted to start the series with the Siege of Badajoz but decided instead to start with a couple of warm up novels These were Sharpe s Eagle and Sharpe s Gold, both published in 1981 Sharpe s Eagle was picked up by a publisher, and Cornwell got a three book deal He went on to tell the story of Badajoz in his third Sharpe novel, Sharpe s Company, published in 1982.Cornwell and wife Judy co wrote a series of novels, published under the pseudonym Susannah Kells These were A Crowning Mercy, published in 1983, Fallen Angels in 1984, and Coat of Arms aka The Aristocrats in 1986 Cornwell s strict Protestant upbringing informed the background of A Crowning Mercy, which took place during the English Civil War In 1987, he also published Redcoat, an American Revolutionary War novel set in Philadelphia during its 1777 occupation by the British.After publishing eight books in his ongoing Sharpe series, Cornwell was approached by a production company interested in adapting them for television The producers asked him to write a prequel to give them a starting point to the series They also requested that the story feature a large role for Spanish characters to secure co funding from Spain The result was Sharpe s Rifles, published in 1987, and a series of Sharpe television films staring Sean Bean.A series of contemporary thrillers with sailing as a background and common themes followed Wildtrack published in 1988, Sea Lord aka Killer s Wake in 1989, Crackdown in 1990, Stormchild in 1991, and Scoundrel, a political thriller, in 1992.In June 2006, Cornwell was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the Queen s 80th Birthday Honours List.Cornwell s latest work, Azincourt, was released in the UK in October 2008 The protagonist is an archer who participates in the Battle of Agincourt, another devastating defeat suffered by the French in the Hundred Years War However, Cornwell has stated that it will not be about Thomas of Hookton from The Grail Quest or any of his relatives.

    672 Comment

    • Jason Koivu said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      A surprisingly sharp-written later novel in the long-running Sharpe series!Stop, stopI need to apologize for that horrible previous line. I'm sorry.Okay, continue:I didn't expect much from Sharpe's Devil, because the war is over. The very basis for these novels' existence is gone. Napoleon has been defeated and it's time for old soldiers to go home. That's just where former British Army officer Richard Sharpe is when duty calls yet again. The wife of an estranged friend desperately wants to know [...]

    • A Bald Mage** Steve said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      I've been meaning to review these for ages, I read all these books a long time ago and I think I would have to re-read them to remember every story line. That's the problem with trying to review books you read over ten years ago. When I read these books it was a happy time for me as I received all the collection including the short stories as a wedding present ten years ago and as I celebrate my tenth anniversary of being married to my beautiful wife, I wanted to save my overall review of the se [...]

    • Graham said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      If SHARPE'S WATERLOO was the rip-roaring climax to Bernard Cornwell's series of Napoleonic War novels, then SHARPE'S DEVIL is the action-packed epilogue. The story, which is set five years after Waterloo, involves Sharpe's run-in with the Emperor himself and subsequent adventures in the Chilean War of Independence with Spain.I won't spoil the story, which was completely unknown to me before I started reading, only to say that Sharpe fits it like a glove. Okay, so it's a little odd that he's not [...]

    • Rithun Regi said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      Not upto the same level as the earlier Sharpe books. However it has one silver lining of painting a historical picture of South America in its early years of struggle to escape the shackles of Spanish tyranny. Harper and Sharpe as usual are at their high levels of camraderie while the conversations with Napoleon shows the charisma of an emperor dethroned. Cochrane is also a very interesting character and this too was a positive from the book.

    • Karla said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      That.was one of the most boring books I've ever listened to. Even being abridged (All the good & important stuff left in, yeah? Isn't that how it goes?) and read by Sean "Sex On Legs Whose Voice Makes Me Puddle" Bean couldn't save it.Beats me why Cornwell's books are so beloved. I can't get into his writing, no matter how hard I try. I hear his Uhtred books are Teh Awsum, but I'll take y'alls words for it. Not going there myself. I fall asleep too easily enough as it is.

    • L.M. Mountford said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      This is a big one for me I have now read/listened to every Sharpe Novel.Unfortunately, it is far from Mr Cornwell's best and as i read it i get the sense he was writing it to fill a publisher's contract or to meet a deadline as there are some notable contradictions to the other Sharpe books, especially Trafalgar. The storyline is a little flat at times and the villain is weak, but the much of what's featured in the pages is a very historically accurate account of the loss of Spain's last colony [...]

    • Marko said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      It's taken me years to read through this series in chronological order (I was reading other stuff as well - I'm not _that_ slow a reader!). The road has been bumpy to say the least, as it included Cornwell's later additions to the storyline (stories inserted into the gaps between his original series) that were almost all of them disappointing. Not that the original series was without fault either, but it included quite a few very enjoyable tales.The Devil begins with Sharpe's meeting with Napole [...]

    • Ed said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      As the saying goes, "All good things must come to an end." The Richard Sharpe series certainly qualifies. This is volume 21 if you list them chronologically, although it was the 13th he wrote. Many years ago, I picked this book up at a used bookstore and read it long before I had any idea who Bernard Cornwell was or Richard Sharpe, either. At the time, I though it was a pretty good book but it didn't motivate me to pursue Cornwell's offerings like reading Stonehenge did many years later. I've no [...]

    • Phil said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      Well this is the last of the major Sharpe novels. I've read them all chronologically from beginning to end including the short stories, so I've been living and breathing Sharpe for about 5 months almost to the the day. It'll be weird not going to bed and enjoying his exploits.This novel takes place about 5 years after Waterloo, with an aging, but still tough as nails Sharpe, and a very tubby Harper. The majority of the story takes place in Chili with Sharpe looking to find out just what has happ [...]

    • Jim said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      I have finally finished reading the entire Richard Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell. It has taken me two years to do so (at an average of a book a month), but I soldiered on -- with glee. I guess that Richard Sharpe is everything I'm not, but everything I've always wanted to be: tall, thin, with a full head of hair, brave, resourceful, strong, and so on. But then, the pictures of Cornwell that I've seen makes me think he is as much a prisoner of wish-fulfillment as I am. Hélas!Sharpe's Devil i [...]

    • Jim said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      Waterloo is a memory. Sharpe meets an ailing Napoleon on St Helena before heading into new and violent experiences in Chile. " Fix your bayonets, men!" Sharpe is in Chile to find an old comrade in arms, Don Blas Vivar, but gets caught up in the Chilean revolutionary war. This book acts as a kind of epilogue to the Sharpe saga spanning several books and reaching a climax at Waterloo. Sharpe meets Thomas Cochrane, a former Lord, who has thrown in his lot with the Chilean rebels against the Spanish [...]

    • Andrew said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      A rip-roaring, swashbuckling finish to a great series. Sharpe goes out with a BANG in his final (at least chronologically!) adventure, which takes him from France to Chile via Longwood House on St Helena for a meeting with Napoleon. Of course, Harper joins him for the ride, as they search for the missing Don Blas Vivar, commanding the Spanish forces in their war against Chilean rebels. During the search, they encounter the man known as The Devil, Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald.

    • Nathan said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      I finished the Sharpe series. A sad day. I have to try and track down the short stories that Cornwell wrote but that will be a challenge being that they are out of print. David H. turned me onto Bernard Cornwell and I have fond memories of him every time I pick up one of his books. Thank you David for introducing me to Richard Sharpe and Bernard Cornwell.

    • Lee said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      The final Sharpe book finds him heading to South America to find an old friend. On the way he stops to pay a visit to Napoleon and agrees to carry a message. After arriving in Chile Sharpe and Harper get involved in the Chilean Civil War.

    • Mavis Hewitt said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      Sharpe comes out of retirement for this one and ends up in Chile. Up to Cornwell's Sharpe normal standard. Perhaps the biggest surprise was, that the most unbelievable bit actually happened! As they say truth is stranger than fiction.

    • Joe said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      This book was a real treat for one who has read all of the other Sharpe books, tracing his career through the Napoleonic wars. This is a fabulous but fact-based story of the revolution in Chile against Spanish royalist rule.

    • Rumfuddle said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      Poor old Sharpe, 6 years retired he's now dragged across the Atlantic to take part in an uprising against Spanish rule in Chile.These latter books feel very tired compared to the earlier ones, looking forward to the end.

    • Tom said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      I have finally finished the Sharpe books and they are one of the best series I have ever read.

    • Kenneth said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      Sharpe goes to South America to save an old friend.

    • David Hull said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      Excellent! Hopefully, Mr. Cornwell will continue to add further books in this wonderful 'Sharpe' series.

    • Rachel said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      Probably my least favourite book in this series, apart from the bit where he meets Napoleon.

    • Rachel White said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      I've finally finished the Sharpe series and I'm so sad about it! I really did love this so much though!I always assumed that I wouldn't like this book as it wasn't set in the Napoleonic Wars but in the aftermath. I actually really enjoyed that aspect of the book. I liked seeing Sharpe and Harper somewhere else showing that their friendship really does stand the test of time. I loved everything about this and am feeling really accomplished that I've finally finished the series!

    • Greg said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      Really enjoyed the series. Sorry it has come to an end.

    • Joyce Lagow said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      No. 21, the final installment of the Richard Sharpe series.[return][return]Normally, when a series reaches a planned climax (in this case, the Battle of Waterloo), any books that come after are usually anticlimactic and have nowhere near the story-telling tension. Cornwell, however, true to form, spins a fascinating adventure tale of 5 years after the end of the Napoleonic Wars.[return][return]It s 1820, Napoleon is nowin exile on St. Helena, and Sharpe, since the end of the war, has been living [...]

    • Darran Phelps said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      I thought as did many others that the end of the Napoleonic wars was the end of Sharpe, but the one last outing into the Americas to recover a missing friend or to finally establish the whereabouts of Bias Vivar's body was as always a fitting end for the pair of friends who had fought side by side across three countries.Sharpe has finally succumbed to the realisation that comes with age of his vulnerability, the tiredness of fighting and the need to settle with the family that awaits him in Fran [...]

    • Ed said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      #21 in the Richard Sharpe series chronologically (#12 in publication order). The finale of the Richard Sharpe saga. Sharpe entered the British Army as an infantryman at the age of 16 and saw action in Flanders, his published adventures begin in India in 1799 and he gains promotion to Sergeant and then Ensign, returning to Britain in 1805 he is involved in the Battle of Trafalgar, in 1807 he is sent as a bodyguard to a diplomatic mission to Copenhagen, and finally 1809 sees him in Portugal for th [...]

    • Dark-Draco said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      I have owned this book for a long time and must have read it at least twice, but I had absolutely no recollection of the story at all.It is after the war and Sharpe is content to be farming Lucille's lands in France. But when an old friend visits him, he is dragged back into conflict Blas Vivar's wife wants him to travel to Chile and find out what happened to her husband. The Spanish authorities say that he is missing, but no body has been found and the reports are confused. With Harper in tow, [...]

    • Rebecca said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      Cochrane was too large a character to not be based on fact, I instantly had to look him up. I felt that for Sharpe, it was a good adventure, but he knows better than this. It seemed as though he almost wanted an excuse to fight once more and be useful, but couldn't admit it to himself. If there had been more of it in the book, more of a restlessness, as though Richard was his own little Napoleon willing himself off an island, then I would have felt the ending more justified. For Sharpe, he's bee [...]

    • HBalikov said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      I fear that this is the latest book that Cornwell will write in his Sharpe series. Latest, not last, because it closes out the Napoleonic Era and leaves Sharpe able to literally follow Voltaire's maxim to ".ivate his own garden (in Normandy)."More good research underlies this book on the role of war veteran adventurers in South America. Some nice portrait work on characters from history such as Adm. Chocrane. A neat blend of military life and strategy in a new context. Cornwell throws in more po [...]

    • Honza Prchal said:
      Jul 20, 2018 - 04:46 AM

      It is, as ever, sad to get to the end of an excellent series (I've go to get the short story, Sharpe's Christmas and one or two other such missed elements out of the way).This one had more of a broad view and lacked some of the snap of the best of the series and taught the reader, or me, anyhow, less about warfare. That may be a problem particular to me, however, since I read the entire Aubrey-Maturin series, which recounts almost all of Cochrane's naval and amphibious warfare exploits, only mo [...]

    Leave a Reply