Entering Fire

Rikki Ducornet


Entering Fire

Entering Fire

  • Title: Entering Fire
  • Author: Rikki Ducornet
  • ISBN: 9780872863552
  • Page: 189
  • Format: Paperback



This startling and brilliantly comic novel tells the stories of two men a father and his estranged son Lamprias de Bergerac is a gentle mystic and amateur botanist who spends his middle aged years in an erotic utopia deep in the ian jungle, collecting specimens of rare orchids and ultimately finding Cucla, the young and free spirited native woman who has become theThis startling and brilliantly comic novel tells the stories of two men a father and his estranged son Lamprias de Bergerac is a gentle mystic and amateur botanist who spends his middle aged years in an erotic utopia deep in the ian jungle, collecting specimens of rare orchids and ultimately finding Cucla, the young and free spirited native woman who has become the love of his life Meanwhile, his demented son Septimus is raised by his mother in prewar Europe, seething with hatred of the father who abandoned him He rises to power in Nazi occupied France, where he goes mad in an obsessive pursuit of racial purity.Rikki Ducornet has a gift for combining the horrific with the hilarious, the realistic with the fantastic Through a wildly inventive narrative, Entering Fire scrutinizes the sources of fascist mentality in nations and, potentially, in all humans Linguistically explosive and socially relevant, her works are solid evidence that Rikki Ducornet is one of the most interesting writers around We are living in an age of intellectual and emotional starvation that is largely without spirituality, cynical about social change and disconnected from the natural world We need writers to look at these difficult issues in a sophisticated manner Ducornet has done this She is the mirror of our innermost selves And she gives us back to ourselves despairing , hopeful, active, contemplative, fractured but surviving, playful, even happy sometimes, and always whole Ducornet s villains have the best lines one only has to think of Hitler or PolPot or any of our assorted tyrants to know that Ducornet s figures are taken from life The Nation Entering Fire displays a cheerfully gruesome audacity and an imagination both lively and bizarre The New York Times Entering Fire is about the metaphoric and potentially evil properties of language it is about origins and motives of myth making This is a novel of ideas often strange ideas that is sustained throughout by brilliant writing London Sunday Times Far from being an escapist fantasy, Entering Fire takes on some of the biggest issues of the 20th century For sheer power, inventiveness and verbal density, it is the best read I ve come across for a long time The Observer A drastically beautiful comic writer who stitches sentences together as if Proust had gone into partnership with Lenny Bruce City Limits imaginative and unbridled fantasy Le Monde an imagination and a style as captivating as it is devastating Lire Unlike anything you ve ever read before L ExpressRikki Ducornet has a gift for combining the horrific with the hilarious, the realistic with the fantastic Through a wildly inventive narrative, Entering Fire scrutinizes the sources of fascist mentality in nations and, potentially, in all humans.


Recent Comments "Entering Fire"

Water has never been my element. Give me a hot wind. Give me fire.The second in Rikki Ducornet's loose quartet of elemental novels, Entering Fire is a fantastic blend of high-level botany, extreme racism, tropical fevers and alchemy, all infused with the author's characteristically deep understanding of sexual instincts and behaviour.Her first book was set in the Loire Valley; this one begins in the same place, but then rapidly expands to take in Occupied Paris, the Brazilian rainforest during t [...]

I love Rikki Ducornet. I love the way she writes. I love the way her mind works. I love that half of this svelte and unpredictable novel is narrated by a kindhearted libertine who falls in lifelong love with a fiery nymph while searching for sexy flowers in the . I love that the other half of this novel is narrated by his bitter and syphilitic son who finds meaning in his existence once he becomes a Nazi and helps torment his fellow Frenchmen during the country's occupation by German forces. I l [...]

You Can Lead a Whore to Culture But You Can’t Meet Her ShrinkThis slender novel is no less rewarding for its size or lack of it: indeed, it's ample proof that a novel doesn't have to be a thousand or 1,500 pages to stimulate our imaginations or thrill us verbally.The chapters more or less alternate between father and son, Lamprias de Bergerac and Septimus de Bergerac. Lamprias is a horticulturist and whoremonger. Septimus is a polemicist and fascist sympathiser/collaborator. The one is metapho [...]

Between the years 1984 and 1986, I grew approximately a couple-three inches. Contemporaneously, overachiever extraordinaire Rikki Ducornet, a writer of great promise in her debut, transformed from a smallish woman into the goddamn Empire State Building. Growth between first and second novels isn’t uncommon. Growth of this caliber? Hen’s teeth.I absolutely adored this novel. It may be one of the most viscerally exhilarating books I’ve ever read, with more charm per square inch than Burt Rey [...]

The second novel in Ducornet’s tetralogy of elements is a chaotic historical narrative about two Bergeracs—the father a long-gone philanderer, the son a long-gone fascist (among other qualities). As in other Ducornet’s novels, Entering Fire has no overt plot and moves between set-pieces wherein her extravagant and exotic imagery, vocabulary, and surreal imagination is allowed free rein to bemuse and amuse. The son Septimus begins to adopt a form of sick raging narrative style that echoes C [...]

The second of Ducornet's cycle of elemental novels, Entering Fire follows the narrower village-and-countryside view of the supurb, earthy The Stain with a much wider scope, both globally and historically, to thread gymnastically through fin-de-siecle hothouse orchids, equatorial swelter, the heat of passion, and the infernos of 20th-century atrocity. She attempts her usual balancing act of finely-wrought vocabulary, pathos, and briskly humorous touch, leading to some rather abrupt mood swings, b [...]

Feels so good to sink into a Rikki Ducornet novel. What joy in language, what a marvelous, lush, strange imagination--such engaging, bizarre characters! Ducornet is the fiction equivalent of a small, intensely rich dessert from some foreign land, full of strange flavors, continually surprising. Having read 'The Word Desire', 'Phosphor In Dreamland', and 'The Fan Maker's Inquisition' long ago, I understandably pounced on 'Entering Fire' when I found it tucked away in a small bookstore, along with [...]

Entering Fire finds Ducornet writing like a cross between Fuentes and Angela Carter, and I suspect a send up of Celine (several quotes from his anti-semetic pamphlets are used as an epigraph) and his world disgust, bitter black humor, and world hopping. Moving from Vichy France, the Brazilian republic, and to red-scare America, oppression and violence are themes, but so is an exalting of every permutation of the human imagination. Every forbidden urge and obsession brought on parade. A poetic an [...]

It was impossible for me to concentrate on my work. My head was swimming with visions of this doll-like creature, her legs like sharpened pencils in the air, her jewelled mouth a ripe fig seeded with teeth. As I fell into her bed I imagined for a fleeting, foolish instant my ancestor's dark, sprawling house transformed by two women living as sisters together, surrounded by an affectionate brood of children. And so, from foggy thinking fired by lust, I created a madhouse.

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Each of Rikki Ducornet's books are cabinets of wonders, full of the marvelous and the monstrous.

There is nothing quite like Ducornet. One feels that she has a whole library and the entirety of the English and French languages at her disposal. Her voice seems nowhere to be found—rather, a spirit diffused into times and characters. I often feel that I cannot place the time in which her books were written, they so effortlessly dip from the evolutions of language and metaphor. A rich, robust vocabulary and knack for juxtaposing the vile and the comedic, Ducornet is a sui generis experience.

Love and hate, love of life and death-in-life are exemplified by a father and son, and by a wife and mother, and several mistresses. The father is voracious for pleasure and adventure, after discovering that his wife is warped by repression; he finds freedom with other women, many of them whores. One of his sons, Septimus, cannot overcome the hatred he feels by being abandoned, and makes hatred his life's purpose by becoming a racist and Nazi collaborator. The novel contrasts the two lives with [...]

I am stuck like a sugarplum in a cabin the size of a gnome's pocket with a pastry cook from Marseille who abstains from soap and a Picard who makes a point of never brushing his teeth.

Entering Fire packed quite a whollop. The small yet potent volume represents fire in Rikki Ducornet's tetralogy of elements. It's a slow burn of a read which, when completed, leaves its reader almost numb. Ducornet writes beautifully and with humor (although the humor felt a bit forced at times), but tragedy gets the starring role in Entering Fire.


  • ☆ Entering Fire || ☆ PDF Read by ✓ Rikki Ducornet
    189 Rikki Ducornet
  • thumbnail Title: ☆ Entering Fire || ☆ PDF Read by ✓ Rikki Ducornet
    Posted by:Rikki Ducornet
    Published :2018-08-15T18:33:22+00:00