Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All

Allan Gurganus s Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All became an instant classic upon its publication Critics and readers alike fell in love with the voice of ninety nine year old Lucy Marsden, one of the most entertaining and loquacious heoines in American literature.Lucy married at the turn of the last century, when she was fifteen and her husband was fifty If ColoAllan Gurganus s Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All became an instant classic upon its publication Critics and readers alike fell in love with the voice of ninety nine year old Lucy Marsden, one of the most entertaining and loquacious heoines in American literature.Lucy married at the turn of the last century, when she was fifteen and her husband was fifty If Colonel William Marsden was a veteran of the War for Southern Independence , Lucy became a veteran of the veteran with a unique perspective on Southern history and Southern manhood Her story encompasses everything from the tragic death of a Confederate boy soldier to the feisty narrator s daily battles in the Home complete with visits from a mohawk coiffed candy striper Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All is proof that brilliant, emotional storytelling remains at the heart of great fiction.
Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All Allan Gurganus s Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All became an instant classic upon its publication Critics and readers alike fell in love with the voice of ninety nine year old Lucy Marsden on

Last surviving Confederate veterans The identity of the last surviving Confederate veterans has been up for debate, and there are several candidates In Lee s Last Retreat The Flight to Appomattox, Confederate Rose Will Rise Again Southern Living Native to China, confederate rose isn t a rose, but a species of hibiscus Hibiscus mutabilis According to legend, it gets its name from the flowers soaking up the He s , She s Together They Make the South Rise Allan Gurganus will never forget the moment in when Lucy Marsden, the narrator of his first novel, Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All, sprang to life. Old City Cemetery Welcome to Old City Cemetery Old City Cemetery is an extraordinary acre public garden, history park, and wedding venue located in the heart of Lynchburg Constitution of the Iroquois Nations Printer friendly version Constitution of the Iroquois Nations THE GREAT BINDING LAW, GAYANASHAGOWA I am Dekanawidah and with the Five Nations Confederate Alabama Census of Confederate Soldiers Home Military Index This Census, conducted by the Alabama Department of Archives and History, recorded a listing of Confederate soldiers What is the oldest city in the United States On November th , former President George H.W.Bush b June th became the oldest living or deadU.S President at years and days living history index Gettysburg Introduction Throughout the year, thousands of reenactors, portraying both Union and Confederate, turn the clock back to July, for the visitors who come to Cooper administration files to move Confederate Gov Roy Cooper wants to move three Confederate statues from the State Capitol grounds to the Bentonville Battlefield historic site in Johnston County. Confederate time capsule found under Civil War memorial A confederate time capsule buried than years ago underneath a Civil War monument on the University of Louisville campus in Kentucky has been opened for the

Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All Originally a television mini series, this drama chronicles the painful and lively reminiscences of a year old woman Much of the story centers on her tumultuous Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All TV Movie The movie, adapted from Allan Gurganus book of the same name, chronicles the life of Lucy Marsden, a ninety nine year old North Carolina woman who, at the age Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All by Allan Allan Gurganus s Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All became an instant classic upon its publication Critics and readers alike fell in love with Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All Vintage Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All is a marvel of narrative showmanship and proof that brilliant, emotional storytelling remains at the heart of great fiction. Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All is a first novel by Allan Gurganus which was on the New York Times Best Seller list for eight months It won the Sue Kaufman Prize from The American Academy of Arts and Letters, was a main selection of the Book of the Month Club, and sold over four million copies. The Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All S E The Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All S E The Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All Part Georgia s last known surviving son of a Confederate The Georgia sons of of Confederate Veterans confirmed on Friday that Booth was in fact the last Oldest Best rated and how to break the cycle of living pay Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All Full As Summers Die , starring Ron O Neal, Beah Richards, Jamie Lee Curtis, Bette Davis Duration Department of Afro American Research Arts Opening Night of Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells November , Licence Joan Hamburg during Opening Night of Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All on Joan Hamburg during Opening Night of Oldest Living Oldest Living Confederate Groupie Tells All SPIN For years, Sweet Connie Hamzy has loved rock stars like no other, counting among her conquests members of the Eagles, Led Zeppelin, and the Who Now ,

He s , She s Together They Make the South Rise Allan Gurganus will never forget the moment in when Lucy Marsden, the narrator of his first novel, Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All, sprang to life. Old City Cemetery Welcome to Old City Cemetery Old City Cemetery is an extraordinary acre public garden, history park, and wedding venue located in the heart of Lynchburg Constitution of the Iroquois Nations Printer friendly version Constitution of the Iroquois Nations THE GREAT BINDING LAW, GAYANASHAGOWA I am Dekanawidah and with the Five Nations Confederate Alabama Census of Confederate Soldiers Home Military Index This Census, conducted by the Alabama Department of Archives and History, recorded a listing of Confederate soldiers What is the oldest city in the United States On November th , former President George H.W.Bush b June th became the oldest living or deadU.S President at years and days living history index Gettysburg Introduction Throughout the year, thousands of reenactors, portraying both Union and Confederate, turn the clock back to July, for the visitors who come to Cooper administration files to move Confederate Gov Roy Cooper wants to move three Confederate statues from the State Capitol grounds to the Bentonville Battlefield historic site in Johnston County. Confederate time capsule found under Civil War memorial A confederate time capsule buried than years ago underneath a Civil War monument on the University of Louisville campus in Kentucky has been opened for the Four Confederate monuments are removed in Rebels erased Balti s four Confederate monuments are removed under cover of darkness as the city council swiftly honors its promise to take down the divisive Living History Event Weekends Harpers Ferry National Artillery crew firing a cannon at Bolivar Heights Battlefield NPS Photo Volunteer Alexandra Harvey

Old City Cemetery Welcome to Old City Cemetery Old City Cemetery is an extraordinary acre public garden, history park, and wedding venue located in the heart of Lynchburg Constitution of the Iroquois Nations Printer friendly version Constitution of the Iroquois Nations THE GREAT BINDING LAW, GAYANASHAGOWA I am Dekanawidah and with the Five Nations Confederate Alabama Census of Confederate Soldiers Home Military Index This Census, conducted by the Alabama Department of Archives and History, recorded a listing of Confederate soldiers What is the oldest city in the United States On November th , former President George H.W.Bush b June th became the oldest living or deadU.S President at years and days living history index Gettysburg Introduction Throughout the year, thousands of reenactors, portraying both Union and Confederate, turn the clock back to July, for the visitors who come to Cooper administration files to move Confederate Gov Roy Cooper wants to move three Confederate statues from the State Capitol grounds to the Bentonville Battlefield historic site in Johnston County. Confederate time capsule found under Civil War memorial A confederate time capsule buried than years ago underneath a Civil War monument on the University of Louisville campus in Kentucky has been opened for the Four Confederate monuments are removed in Rebels erased Balti s four Confederate monuments are removed under cover of darkness as the city council swiftly honors its promise to take down the divisive Living History Event Weekends Harpers Ferry National Artillery crew firing a cannon at Bolivar Heights Battlefield NPS Photo Volunteer Alexandra Harvey Sons of Confederate Veterans plan flags along NC The Sons of Confederate Veterans plan to raise large Confederate flags in every North Carolina county along the interstate, a spokesman told Spectrum News.

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    Allan Gurganus
  • thumbnail Title: õ Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All || ñ PDF Download by ↠ Allan Gurganus
    Posted by:Allan Gurganus
    Published :2018-03-21T07:17:56+00:00

About the Author

Allan Gurganus

Since 1989, Allan Gurganus s novels, stories and essays have become a singularly unified and living body of work Known for dark humor, erotic candor, pictorial clarity and folkloric sweep, his prose is widely translated Gurganus s stories, collected as Piccoli eroi , were just published to strong Italian reviews France s La Monde has called him a Mark Twain for our age, hilariously clear eyed, blessed with perfect pitch Fiction by Gurganus has inspired the greatest compliment of all memorization and re reading The number of new critical works, the theatrical and film treatments of his fiction, testify to its durable urgency Adaptations have won four Emmy Robert Wilson of The American Scholar has called Gurganus the rightful heir to Faulkner and Welty In a culture where branding seems all important, Gurganus has resisted any franchised repetition Equally adept at stories and novels or novellas, his tone and sense of form can differ widely On the page Gurganus continues to startle and grow.Of his previous work The Practical Heart , critic Michiko Kakutani wrote in the New York Times, Masterly and deeply affecting a testament to Mr Gurganus s ability to inhabit his characters inner lives and map their emotional histories The Atlantic called the same work, An entertaining, disturbing and inspiring book a dazzling maturation Of Local Souls , Wells Tower wrote It leaves the reader surfeited with gifts This is a book to be read for the minutely tuned music of Gurganus s language, its lithe and wicked wit, its luminosity of vision shining all the brighter for the heat of its compassion No living writer knows about how humans matter to each other These are tales to make us whole Gurganus s first published story Minor Heroism appeared in theNew Yorker when he was twenty six In 1974, this tale offered the first gay character that magazine had ever presented In 1989, after seven years composition, Gurganus presented the novel Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All Sue Kaufman Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters This first book spent eight months on theNew York Times bestseller list it became the subject of a New Yorkercartoon and remains a clue on Jeopardy Names for 400 The novel has been translated into twelve languages and has sold over two million copies The CBS adaptation of the work, starring Donald Sutherland and Diane Lane and won and a Best Supporting Actress Emmy for Cecily Tyson as the freed slave, Castalia.Along with Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All, Gurganus s works include White People, Los Angeles Times Book Prize, Pen Faulkner Finalist as well as the novel Plays Well With Others His last book was The Practical Heart Four Novellas Lambda Literary Award Gurganus s short fiction appears in the New Yorker, Harper sand other magazines A recent essay was seen in The New York Review of Books His stories have been honored by the O Henry Prize Stories, Best American Stories, and The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction Gurganus was a recent John Simon Guggenheim Fellow His novella Blessed Assurance A Moral Tale, from White People, has become part of the Harvard Business School s Ethics curriculum The work is discussed at length in Questions of Character Harvard Business School Press by Joseph L Badaracco.Born in Rocky Mount, North Carolina in 1947 to a teacher and businessman, Gurganus first trained as a painter, studying at the University of Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts His paintings and drawings are represented in private and public collections Gurganus has illustrated three limited editions of his fiction During a three year stint onboard the USS Yorktown during the Vietnam War, he turned to writing Gurganus subsequently graduated from Sarah Lawrence College where he d gone to work with Grace Paley At the Iowa Writers Workshop, his mentors were Stanley Elkin and John Cheever Mr Gur

361 Comment

  • Suzanna said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    I could not finish this book. For the most part, every page was a chore. The few times there was a story relayed from the husband's Civil War experience, I was engaged. Otherwise, I found the main character far too abrasive and obnoxious to enjoy myself. She might be very entertaining to sit and talk with, or listen to on a radio program, but for some reason, by reading in this format we had a personality conflict. Additionally, there was heavy focus on subjects that didn't feel pertinent. Page [...]

  • Courtney Anthony said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    This book is a gift to anyone who can read English. I realize that many reviews accuse it of being overly long, but it's called Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells ALL, not Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells A Story or Two. The novel is indeed seven-hundred and some pages long, but think of it as an opportunity for settling in and truly getting to know Mrs. Lucille Marsden. Enjoy her narrative while it lasts, because you'll miss her when it's over. Trust me.It is astounding to me that this [...]

  • Caroline said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    Whenever I'm reading this book I remember how much I love it, and yet after I've finished it and moved on to other things I forget it. I don't forget what happens or what it's about - I forgot how much I like it. It's strange.It's a big old rambling book - the personal recollections of Lucille Marsden, married at fifteen to a Confederate war veteran a good forty years older than her. It's not told in any kind of narrative order, it skips and jumps backwards and forwards through the years, things [...]

  • Sally Burnell said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    Have you ever picked up a book simply because the title intrigued you? This was just such a book, and once I cracked it open, it became impossible to put it down. It was one of the most compelling and memorable books I have read in years and it has stayed with me all these years since I read it. It is one of the most unforgettable books I have ever read and tells the story of a 15 year old girl, Lucy, who marries a 51 year old Confederate veteran, naively not knowing what she was getting herself [...]

  • Linda B.D. said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    Horrible book.I waited a few days & looked at this book again. before I made a final review. This is NOT about the Civil War. Supposedly told by a 100 year old woman to a writer. She told her story of being married to a Confederate War veteran.(After the war). He had PTSD & it sure seems she got it from him. I wish it kept on a straighter path. Too much back & forth from the war to her present time. By her age of 24 yrs old, she had 9 children. It does show exactly what the war was l [...]

  • Julie said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    This is one of my all time favorite books. I read it some years ago, but still have my copy. This should definitely return to my "to read" list. The narrator, Lucille (Lucy) Marsden, tells the story of her marriage to "Captain" Will Marsden, ostensibly the Civil War's last survivor, whom she married when she was 15 and he was 50. She also tells about her husband's experiences in the war and after, the burning of her mother-in-law's plantation by Sherman's men, and the abduction from Africa of a [...]

  • Linds said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    This book was a huge best seller in the 80's when it came out but I can't see the appeal.Lucy married a 50 year old confederate war veteran when she was 15. Reading this book. I actually stopped reading and I thought, there was no way a woman wrote this because of the way the character spoke and the internal monologue thought process. So I looked at the author, and sure enough, it was a man. I knew it. It comes across as an ill-informed man writing about the inner workings of the female mind. So [...]

  • Amy said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    I read Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All *once* years and years ago (maybe more than 20(?) years ago, now). I can't quite pinpoint exactly what impact this story had on me, but there are times that I *still* think about scenes from this book. Something about it just got into me and stayed put. And I tell you what, give me Lucy Marsden over that annoying Scarlett O'Hara any day.

  • Fenixbird SandS said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    Quoting excerpts from this extraordinary book: "11 days after the fire comes the afternoon of leaving. Children make extra-secret jaunts to the woods. Like going to a zoo, or visiting some charming friend in jail. How strange the furnishings look resting out here, half under tarps. The Brookside glade makes treasures seem more valuable and perfect. A test for beautiful furniture: Does it still look beautiful in a beautiful woods?" Gurganus' descriptions are vivid, almost liquid! You can breathe [...]

  • Michele said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    Possibly the longest book I've read where, when I finished it, I wanted to go back and read it again. As a Northerner, at the time I read it, I was rather clueless about the Civil War and the South. I'm mildly more clued-in these days, but this book helped open up a voice and an attitude for me that had not been there before.The writing is dramatic, to the point where I'm sure some readers found it too far over the top to deal with. I have read the "scene" of the heroine's mother's childhood enc [...]

  • Brian Grover said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    A big novel, both in narrative scope and in heft, this unfortunately didn't come close to living up to some of the praise on the jacket cover. Lucy Marsden, about to celebrate her 100th year of life, tells her story to an unnamed narrator from the bed of her nursing home, flashing back to her wedding at age 15 (circa 1900) to a Civil War vet in her small North Carolina town that's 30 years her senior, and of their life together. More accurately, it's the story of a segment of that time, starting [...]

  • Alicia said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    I probably shouldn't say I read this book because I only read 50 of the 700 pages. I did watch the movie, though. Does that count?The narrator, Lucille (Lucy) Marsden, tells the story of her marriage to "Captain" Will Marsden, the Civil War's last survivor, whom she married when she was 15 and he was 51!! She also tells about her husband's experiences in the war, the burning of her mother-in-law's plantation by Sherman's men, and the abduction from Africa of a former Marsden slave, midwife to Lu [...]

  • Andrea said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    This library book, besides being already one of the best books I've ever read, had a bonus: someone had saved some flowers in the pages, pressed and dried but still beautiful. Now that I finally finished reading this book, I can unequivocally say it's the best book I've ever read, based on the quality of the writing, the story, the development of the characters, the insights into human behavior, including mine, the humor, the honesty, the fact that I could have kept on reading for another 700 pa [...]

  • Sandy said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    I loved this book so much that I ordered the DVD, but then I love stories about the 1800s. I could identify with Ms. Marsden because I have raised children. I have been a wife. Some of her insight brought me comfort just knowing that someone else walked down similar paths I have, and even worse. Reading this book made me grateful that I live in a time of peace in our nation. Grateful for the modern day comforts we enjoy. I enjoyed the friendship Ms. Marsden and Castilia came to know. I even fell [...]

  • Timothy Juhl said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    Officially, what I consider a tome, Gurganus' masterpiece, is one of the finest examples of historical fiction, and particularly the Civil War.Forget the dreadful made-for-television movie, forget 'Gone With The Wind'. There is a langorous chapter midway into the story that depicts Sherman's March to the sea, told by the plantation owners and slaves who watched the plumes of smoke from distant homes, knowing their lives would be burned out from under them very soon. The images evoked in this cha [...]

  • Mary Bettcher said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    I read this book years ago and found it one of the most poignant , funny and at times, achingly sad books I've ever read.The widow is delivering her recollections to an aide at her nursing home circa early 1970's I believe. She had been born some time after the Civil War but her much older husband had been a Confederate colonel. Her recollections stem from his experiences and her own post war memories. The horrors or the Civil War come alive and yet somehow,there were periods of laugh out loud h [...]

  • Deb said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    It would have been better at half the length and with 70% fewer characters. It was hard to motivate to read it beyond page 400 or so. Many characters are discussed at various times but their stories are not closed. Stories within are told in no chronological order and it is often difficult to place the current story in the life of the narrator and in relation to other stories (did the baby die before or after the son was blinded?) Interesting voice for the narrator.

  • Candy said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    I tried really hard to finish this book. While the confederate widow herself was a very colorful character with quite a story to tell, the book was written like a elderly person rambling on and on and on, whether anyone was listening or not. The character bounced back and forth between the past and the present and the present didn't enhance the story at all. I think this story could have been written much better. It has the makings of a really good story. I gave up reading this book.

  • Linda Robinson said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    I have loaned this book to friends, all of whom couldn't finish it.Ellen Burstyn opened in a Broadway show of the same name, and it closed that night.I'm confused. This is a darn good read. And a beautiful first novel!What do I find fascinating about it? And why don't my friends share?

  • Maureen said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    I just can’t do this. The story is interesting enough, but the conversational way the story is told by one very old southern lady is too much to follow. May pick at it a little over time.

  • Sterlingcindysu said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    I read this ages ago. I still remember the mink farm and what the old man did! Now that's a powerful image.

  • Andrea said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    While this book was beautifully written, it just goes on for far too long. It just goes and goes and goes into the story of this woman's life and her husband's life, and when narrator runs out of anything to talk about at around page 500 (after having stretched in for the last 100), she just keeps on going for another 200 pages. I've read Anna Karenina and War and Peace and those earned their length - this did not.

  • Lani said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    I'd tried to read this book several times. It is one of the slowest paced but still decent books I've ever read. I'm glad I finally finished, but I can't say I would recommend it to well, anyone I can think of.I'm a Civil War buff and I'm always intrigued by the female perspective. The title character (Lucy) is a pretty interesting premise to start with a young boy went off to war, grew up and got old, and married a young girl. Lucy ends up married to a Confederate veteran and living with him th [...]

  • Melody said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    I'm going to tell you the biggest drawbacks of this book right up front. First - I had tried to read it several years ago and abandoned it. Almost abandoned it this time too. I had to read past the obligatory 100 pages before it engaged me. And believe the title when it says "tells all". My copy was 875 pages long. Which is plenty long. But this book had a way of not letting you seem to be making any progress. I'd be one inch into the book. Read for a week. And still be only one inch into the bo [...]

  • Jen3n said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    Several of my favorite novels, I have discovered, were written by people who had no business writing a novel like that. This is one of them.Allan Gurganus managed to write a novel about the past hundred and fifty years in the deep south, in the voice of a woman, while keeping it sincere, engaging, realistic, and entertaining. The characters feel real. Even the people who only inhabit the book for a page. This book takes an historical time and makes it a breathing place; if that distinction makes [...]

  • Cameron said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    I feel bad reviewing this book because quite honestly I couldn't finish it. I had listened with delight to an audio version (severely abridged to three hours) but the book was just too wordy. Gurganus is a truly gifted writer, but this book could easily lose 500 pages, as there is just too much verbiage and the reader gets frustrated and bored. The audio version allows you to enjoy the language, the convoluted storytelling, the weird horror of living with a traumatized ex-soldier for decades aft [...]

  • Patricia dumas said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    Wow What a tale.The south in all its pitiful glory, angst, grit and guts; It's protocol that lost the war-- a sense of lost gentility and ignorance. Just when you get to maybe like the heroine Lucy's husband, your faith is cut short.Through 9 children, and a longing to find something useful in herself, Lucy fails, and succeeds-- then fails and succeeds again.Never again will you look at a "romantic" southern mansion the same. It's not romantic, as I learned in this fabulously written novel.Loved [...]

  • Julia said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    I really should steer clear of books & authors who won literary prizes. Uh Such an annoying book. I skipped probably more than I actually read, but really who has time for so much rambling? Would the book have been maybe 1/3 of the actual length it would have been more than enough What was the author thinking? Where was the editor?The contents could have been really interesting, but the writing style killed any kind of reading flow which in turn killed my interest

  • KKG said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    Long and kinda boring, but it has its moments. Definitely not for a person picky on historical accuracy.

  • ManaChelle said:
    Jun 21, 2018 - 08:21 AM

    I love this book. Couldn't put it down :)

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